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Framing and drywall around basement HVAC / Water Heater?

Framing and drywall around basement HVAC / Water Heater?

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  #1  
Old 01-11-15, 04:59 PM
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Framing and drywall around basement HVAC / Water Heater?

Does anyone have any links to how-to's or videos on building basement walls around HVAC and water heater?

Local code requires a minimum of 3". I may provide greater clearance on some sides, but irregardless, I don't have a clue how to drywall walls, that close to a permanent structure.

Do you construct these walls on floor, apply drywall, then stand them up? Looked around the web and found nothing on this. So either I'm over-thinking it or missing something simple.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:12 PM
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Do you mean 3'?

Regardless, the way to do walls is create the frame, stand it up, anchor it in place, and then add drywall. Use pressure-treated wood for the parts that would touch cement floors.

Your code probably requires that the HVAC and Water Heater remain in an unfinished portion of your basement, so any walls you're putting up would be interior walls, right? Not exterior ones? Or is there a combination of interior ones around this stuff and exterior ones elsewhere?

Here are some links on that stuff ...
How to Finish a Basement: Framing and Insulating
Basement Framing - How to Frame Your Unfinished Basement
Framing Basement Walls - Design, Preperation and Execution
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:16 PM
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Thanks, but no. Code says 3" or appliance manufacturer requirement, whichever is greater.

I'm not talking about the front or combustion space, just back and sides.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:26 PM
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Basement ceilings and floors can be too tricky, sometimes, to erect walls and stand them in place. Determine where you want your walls by drawing them on the floor for starters, making sure you have the adequate clearances. Use pressure treated 2x lumber for the bottom plate and SPF for the top plate and studs of adequate length for the vertical members. You can use a plumb bob to determine the location of your top plate once you are satisfied with your floor layout, then install the studs. Leave enough of an opening in the closet so you can remove each appliance independently of the other in case of replacement. Any door you use will need to be louvered so as to provide combustion air if anything is gas powered, and it is good to have it to help dispel heat generated by any appliance.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:31 PM
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Ok. I'd be scared of putting drywall within 3 inches of any kind of heating appliance, but if that's what you want to do ...

I made another assumption, so I better ask before I stick my foot in my mouth. Are you planning on having drywall on the appliance side? Or are you going to leave that side unfinished and only put drywall on the outside?

What kind of heating is your equipment? (Oil, gas, electric, etc)
 
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Old 01-11-15, 10:22 PM
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I plan on building all the walls in-place for the reasons you list above, but when it came to putting walls around the HVAC and water heater, I realized I didn't have a clue how to get drywall up once those walls were in place. I planned to drywall both sides, to insulate the living space from the noise of the furnace / AC.

Here's some pics of what I was planning.







This is about the only thing I could find covering the subject.

How to Enclose a Furnace Room | Home Guides | SF Gate

 
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Old 01-12-15, 03:50 AM
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Except for the paper face - drywall doesn't burn. I think the 3" rule is pretty much universal. I normally see the drywall hung before the HVAC is installed. It will be tricky to install the drywall now but you can use adhesive, screw the drywall where you can and use whatever to scotch the rest in place until the adhesive sets.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 05:11 AM
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Ok. I DID misunderstand - I thought you were leaving the furnace side unfinished (blinded by my own project) and having studs facing the furnace area. My bad.

Also, disclaimer: my current project is the first time I've done framing, so I'm learning a lot about framing and concrete right now (I'm framing using the exact method chandler described above), but I have hung a lot of sheetrock. In my opinion the most annoying part of what you have there is going to be trying to mud the corner of the drywall ... are you going to have space/angles to fit your body back there? Or are you planning on just taping the seams and not mudding over them?
 
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Old 01-12-15, 06:25 PM
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Strange I couldn't find any information on the "interwebs" discussing installing drywall around fixed obstacles.

Because this wall will probably have to be anchored above with blocking between the joists, I may be able to build this wall on the floor. When I stand it up I can install the blocking in tight to the top plate. Only reason I'm considering this, is because I could install the drywall first.

If I did this though I know I wouldn't be able to adjust the wall at all after the drywall is installed.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 06:51 PM
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Not sure if this will help at any point, but when it becomes difficult to stand up a 7' wall in a 7' room I would allow for an additional 1.5" and install an extra bottom plate on the floor first. Then build the 7' wall 1.5" short, add the drywall (one side) while laying down. Then when you stand it up you can lift it into place and secure.

FYI,
Bud
 
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Old 01-13-15, 03:26 AM
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If I did this though I know I wouldn't be able to adjust the wall at all after the drywall is installed.
The correct/best method would have been to erect/finish the wall prior to the installation of the mechanicals BUT since that didn't happen there will always be compromises. You just have to figure out which makes the most sense for your application.
 
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Old 01-14-15, 06:21 PM
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If you want noise reduction, an extra side of drywall won't do much and is obviously a pain to install. It will cost more, but build the frame normally, add wire or strapping to the back of the frame, put up Roxul Safe &Sound insulation, then put up drywall on the living area side. You won't hear the furnace & Roxul is non-combustable.
 
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Old 01-14-15, 11:37 PM
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I like that idea, thanks!
 
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