Thoroseal vs. Drylok

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Old 01-21-15, 03:54 AM
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Thoroseal vs. Drylok

Recently stumbled upon the Thoroseal line of products. Does anyone have any experience with these materials? For what it's worth, Super Thoroseal clamins resistance of up to 200 psi, while Drylok claims 15 psi. I understand moisture issues are best tackled on the exterior, just looking for a product comparison when sealing interior, basement block walls. Thanks
 
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Old 01-21-15, 06:08 AM
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One of the characteristics to look for is the vapor permeability of the material. I haven't researched it, but remember reading that although drylok can block some liquid water leakage it is vapor open, allowing the blocks or concrete to dry to the inside. Not familiar with Thoroseal, but vapor open or vapor barrier is something you would want to know.

Bud
 

Last edited by Bud9051; 01-21-15 at 06:09 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 01-21-15, 07:05 AM
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Waterproofing and moisture control needs to be done on the outside not the inside.
 
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Old 01-25-15, 04:17 AM
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thoroseal is FAR superior to the other **** it will often be a specified material on commercial & public works jobs while the other **** is sold to diy'ers-h/o's @ apron/vest stores

we prefer thoroseal's bagg'd mix over the premix'd buckets.
 
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Old 01-25-15, 05:31 AM
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Just had the Drylock rep in our store the other day. Got on the subject of PSI rating. Without going into specifics the ratings mean absolutely nothing! Drylock started the rating, the others started using it and inflated it (it's all based on a solid wall of water against your basement wall) to the point that it means nothing. Drylock admits its no more than a marketing tool. Is one better than the other? Not by using the PSI rating.
 
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Old 01-25-15, 10:50 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

Stadry - what makes Thoroseal a superior product when compared to Drylok? Just want to make an informed decision and understand the differences between the 2 products. Thanks
 
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Old 01-25-15, 12:37 PM
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Thoroseal has been around long before someone came up with a DIY "paint-type" coating.

As an engineer, I used Thoroseal for a final surface coat on concrete control houses and final surface coatings for repairs for concrete dams. It is also used for architectural coatings. If you look at the instructions for mixing and applying, you will see which is a serious material and what is just a DIY paint-type coating with some vague claims.

Thoroseal must be mixed properly and allowed to set a few minutes (fatten up) before the final water is added. It should be applied to a misted walls surface for easy of application and to allow better penetration into the concrete. A second coat should be applied 24 hours later to the previous application to achieve a better bond and create a tight, dense coat. After 24 hours it gets hard to get anything to penetrate an older Thoroseal application, but an adhesive modifier could be added to a late coat. - It is about the consistency of pancake batter. I don't believe you get as good results within out-of-the-can material since the cement in it works much better if it is fresh.

Drylock is strictly a convenient, simple and easy product developed strictly for the DIY market and is much easier to apply. It is easier than handling a 8" wide brush loaded up with a thick, heavy load of Thoroseal, but not as much fun.

It all depends on what results you expect.

Dick
 
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Old 01-26-15, 04:22 AM
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Thanks Concretemasonry - Thoroseal does sound like a much more serious product as I research it more. One more basic question - will the entire 50 lb sack and the water/Acryl 60 fit in a 5 gallon bucket? Thanks again!
 
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Old 01-26-15, 04:55 AM
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I've never used thoroseal but I doubt you could mix it all at once in a 5 gallon bucket BUT there is no reason you can't mix a partial bag at a time.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 09:14 AM
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I have experience with our bridge contractors using ThoroSeal since the 1980s, or even 1970s, with excellent results as long as all mixing and application instructions are followed. It's on the approved products list of many state DOTs for good reasons. I've also used DryLok a few times in my own basements, and there is no comparison between the 2 products. My DryLok applications had a tendency to soften, or chalk, after a few years of service, which is something that will never happen with the more durable ThoroSeal.

There shouldn't be any reason why partial bags can't be mixed, as long as all of the dry ingredients in a bag are thoroughly mixed before separating into mixing batches.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 05:13 AM
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here's a trick of which many are unaware,,, yes, a bag's contents + liquid CAN generally be mixed in 5g bkts but you'll often wind up wearing some of the splashed mtl,,, 6g bkts are obviously much more forgiving,,, find them @ any pool service company usually free, too !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

xypex AND kryton are also good mtls for an ' approved equal '
 

Last edited by stadry; 01-30-15 at 07:15 AM.
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