Dealing with foundation leaks

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  #1  
Old 01-31-15, 05:40 AM
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Dealing with foundation leaks

My basement tends to flood after heavy rain, so I decided to peel back the wood paneling in the basement, since the basement was finished before I moved in and noticed a rather large cover up of material over a crack. I also see cracks in that cover up so I'm guessing that's my answer right there. I'm also positive there is mold under the carpet (yea I know carpet in a basement?) and some mold on some of the framing. There was no insulation between the paneling and the foundation. Just framing. My question is, how should I attack it? Should I sand down the old material and reapply a cement sealer? Also I have a concrete slab above the crack outside that broke away from the house about an inch to an inch and a half. I used self leveling sealant to fill that crack and still got water. Was also wondering if it's possible that some bricks needing to be repointed had anything to do with water getting in. Should I just attack the cracks in the foundation first and test it and go from there? Thanks everyone, sorry for such a long newbie post. I appreciate it!
 
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Old 01-31-15, 05:48 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

As you probably know the only good way to address the water problems is from the outside. Are you gutters piped away from the house? Does the slab pitch away from the house or funnel water to the house?
 
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Old 01-31-15, 06:23 AM
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You may want to post pictures of the slab and surrounding area so we can see what you see. Definitely any water problems are best attacked from the outside, not inside. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 01-31-15, 06:39 AM
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Hi Pf and welcome to the forum.
While you have that area open (it may be open through spring) it will allow you to observe the results of your outside work, directing the majority of the water away from the foundation. Since you would be doomed to failure trying to stop the leaks from the inside, waiting until you are certain the outside work has solved the problem will allow you to put everything back together with some confidence it will be ok.

The bad news is liquid water is only part of the moisture problem. Moisture vapor will be moving from below your slab and footings up through those walls regardless of what you do inside. Finishing a basement that was never built to be finished (99% of all basements) will require lots of reading and eventually a moisture management approach. Done correctly, they can be made livable and mold free. Done in haste and on a limited budget they are best left as an unfinished basement.

Moldy carpet, moldy wood, you have a lot to remove.
BSD-103: Understanding Basements — Building Science Information

Bud
 
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Old 01-31-15, 11:11 AM
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tendencies to flood point to larger issues such as active channels for water to invade your very fine bsmt,,, i'd toss everything w/mold & begin anew - ever if it had only mildew, out it'd go !

rarely can 1 successfully use a self-leveling sealant - better you should use closed cell backer rod & vertical/knife grade sealants installed per mfg'er's directions.

the main reason most try to manage water inside a bsmt ( sump, pump, sub-floor drainage ) is its too expensive doing retro-waterproofing outside,,, emecole is diy-friendly & has good crack materials imo IF you have a bsmt wall of conc,,, cmu's are another issue & more difficult
 
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Old 01-31-15, 11:59 AM
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Wow didn't think I'd get any responses on my first post! I'm going to take a few pictures of the crack, cement slab, and the drainage in and around the problem are , maybe we can bat some ideas around. I clearly know there's a crack in the foundation. Wouldn't the step probably be to break ground and fix the crack from the outside and then pitch the slab away from the house? I think it's pitched now, have to level it but it could probably definitely be pitched more: I'm just not sure if bricks needing repointing or the drainage can be also possibly be the problem. Thanks for all the help and thoughts guys. I really appreciate it. I'm loving this forum already
 
  #7  
Old 02-04-15, 07:38 PM
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Hey guys, I found the exact leak in the foundation wall in my basement, also had a mold expert come take samples all around the basement, which was pricy, but needed to be done clearly. Waiting for the reports back to do the remediation of all the spots. My question is what should I use to to plug the leak until better weather when I can plan to excavate that slab and get to the bottom of the problem. I want a solid temporary fix til spring time, because I would hate for the whole basement to be remediated just to have the leak continue. Thoughts on a strong temporary fix? Thanks again everyone!
 
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Old 02-07-15, 04:31 PM
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for an active leak, nothing short of injected hydrophyllic polyurethane foam,,, emecole sells kits AND they're diy friendly [no $ interest] this may even remediate the leak but look for it to start in another spot later on,,, IF its not leaking, hydraulic cement properly install'd is a good temporary solution,,, comparing your bsmt to a ship's hull below the waterline often helps 1 understand why bsmts leak
 
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