Water in basement


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Old 03-23-15, 04:01 PM
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Water in basement

I have owned this home for about 5 years and just recently the basement family room has started getting water in it. I had a laminate floor and it started to pop and buckle from the amount of water. I took that flooring up and dried the floor. After a couple of months I then put down a new laminate flooring and have noticed that water is getting in again. While the flooring was up I never noticed any accumulation of water. Once the flooring was down is when water started to appear. I have checked water lines and appliances and there is nothing leaking. The water is clear, not muddy or dirty. I ran a water hose on the side of the house where this water is accumulating and the ground soaked up the water but I never noticed a large amount of water entering the room. For the most part the grading of the soil looks like it takes the water away from the house. There has been a noticeable amount erosion in the area (I have a citricon system that was put in 5 years ago that is about 2 inches above the ground now) We also had a good rain throughout the day yesterday and I still do not notice a large accumulation of water. What am I missing?
 
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Old 03-23-15, 04:34 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Have you done the garbage bag test for moisture coming up through the slab?
 
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Old 03-24-15, 06:56 AM
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You said you had water in the basement and removed the first floor. Then installed another floor and have water in the basement again. You didn't mention if you had done anything to address the water problem. So, what did you do after the first floor was ruined to solve the water problem?
 
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Old 03-24-15, 07:22 AM
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Do you want the good news or the bad news/ I'll guess and start with the good, for what it is.

The good news is you now know you have a wet basement and hopefully you can avoid installing another moisture susceptible floor (and walls).
The bad news is, it will require major work to just manage your water and moisture issues and you will probably never have a dry basement.

Your first step will be identifying the current source of your problem. It can be a leak, or it can be moisture vapor passing through the soil getting trapped under that flooring. With everything removed it looks dry, but moisture vapor is constantly passing through and evaporating before it accumulates. Some links:
BSD-012: Moisture Control for New Residential Buildings — Building Science Information

BA-1015: Bulk Water Control Methods for Foundations — Building Science Information

Bud
 
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Old 03-30-15, 12:13 PM
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bud, NEVER say that,,, i've still got a bride to feed + i like to eat, too how can i keep our current travel schedule UNLESS we waterproof bsmts ??????????? scheeesscchhhhhhh !

back to the op - get all the stuff/junk off the floor & run a fan/dehumidifier to help draw moisture OUT of the conc,,, not TOO much as wet runs to dry just as heat runs to cold there are epoxies you can install which will stop water penetration.

i'd imagine you also have to stop/manage the water, too !
 
  #6  
Old 03-30-15, 12:56 PM
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@ srtadry, since the op hasn't returned I guess we can drift a little. I assume you are referring to "it will require major work to just manage your water and moisture issues and you will probably never have a dry basement." Be honest, how many basements have you seen that don't have a water or moisture issue? And even when you do find one, they still need to be prepared for that 100 year storm or the broken washing machine hose.

From my experience, doing the best anyone can do on a retrofit will still require a dehumidifier and a sump pit, that's the nature of building over a hole in the ground. But don't worry, you work is much needed as people will still want to try.

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 04-09-15, 05:44 AM
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sorry for the late reply, bud - just got back home

many basements have a water or moisture issue due, largely, to bldg code rqmnts + ignorant bldrs/owners when 1 considers a bsmt is comparable to a ship's hull below the waterline, results are much easier to understand

sincerely, srtadry
 
 

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