Remove old cement fireplace base


  #1  
Old 03-26-15, 11:39 AM
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Remove old cement fireplace base

Hello all! New to the forum and looking for some advice. A quick background: My wife and I recently purchased our first home, which has a mostly unfinished basement. The plan over the next year or two is to finish it, doing as much as we can on our own (in the hopes of building some solid equity into the home).

Our first step involves the floor: there is a cement/rock slab sticking up from the floor about 1-2" that appears to the be the base of an old fireplace or furnace (the house was built in 1979). Does anybody have any advice on how to remove this thing? I've attached a couple pictures to help you get a better idea of what I'm referring to.

Thanks in advance!

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  #2  
Old 03-26-15, 02:25 PM
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Brick chisle, hammer, googles would be the cheap way.
Just hold the chisle close to the floor so you do not damage the slab.
 
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Old 03-26-15, 04:52 PM
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Make sure by some means the floor wasn't poured around the hearth. IF so, it may be more difficult to remove. IF it is sitting on top of the concrete floor, then do as Joe says, or rent/buy an SDS drill with demolition blades. Keep the angle low.
 
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Old 03-27-15, 06:52 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. It appears to be sitting on top of the concrete floor, but I can't be certain. I'm thinking it will be pretty evident as soon as I started chiseling. If it is sitting on top, do you think it would come up pretty clean without the need for much grinding/sanding or filling to level the floor? I'm guessing it will be hard to avoid that step regardless, but just wondering if you have had any past experience.

Any idea how much an SDS drill would cost to buy vs. rent? I'm not really sure what else I would use it for if I bought it, but if the price were similar, I'm all about getting value out of the money I spend. The hammer and chisel idea seems like it could be a bit labor intensive, but feasible. I'm definitely willing to put a little elbow grease into it if the other option is too expensive.
 
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Old 03-27-15, 12:16 PM
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Google Bosch Bull Dog.
There not cheap, but a handy tool for small chisel or concrete drilling jobs.
 
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Old 03-27-15, 01:54 PM
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Thanks joecaption. A quick Google search revealed the local Home Depot will rent out demolition hammers for $40-$65 per day, depending on how powerful a tool I want/need. I think that is the route I will take, since the rental price seems reasonable. Any tips on using one of these things?
 
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Old 03-27-15, 02:30 PM
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Set the SDS on hammer, install a flat (possibly slightly bent) bit in it and chisel away. It is basically a jack hammer in a small package.
 
 

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