Moving Washer and Dryer


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Old 05-02-15, 05:14 PM
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Moving Washer and Dryer

In part of my 'designs' on finishing our basement, I have been contemplating relocating our washer and dryer from its current (side) wall of basement to a different (back wall) about 20 feet away so that I can box in our furnace and washer/dryer together.

We have new LG High Efficiency washer and Gas dryer less then a year old.

They will basically be moving almost underneath my kitchen area as well, which also has a gas oven.

All walls and ceilings are currently not finished, so I have direct access to all piping.

I believe I have the skills to tap into the copper water pipes and add Pex lines for the hot and cold. And I can run electric pretty easily as well.

And current plan is to use a utility tub and pump the water back up into existing pipes and out of the house.

What I'm uncertain of is 2 things.

1. The gas line. I will probably call for an estimate to add a line to the area, as that is something I think may even require a valid 'pro' to ensure no home insurance issues.

2. Dryer venting. I would prefer to go straight up and out of the house. But I believe that will place the exhaust under a window. Am not certain if that will cause an issue meeting any codes? If I can't go straight up, I would need to make a 90 degree turn and run about 15 feet back to the side of the house.

Can anyone add any tips or suggestions on things possibly being overlooked?

Thanks
PT
 

Last edited by ptmuldoon; 05-02-15 at 06:11 PM.
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Old 05-02-15, 05:27 PM
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If you can do the water & the electric, you can probably do the gas too. In some places, the home owner can do plumbing as long as it is up to code. That's usually not the case with electric. It's up to you if you want to have it inspected or not. Some people want the certification as you said, for insurance issues.
 
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Old 05-03-15, 04:51 PM
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Thanks Pulpo.

It looks like T'ing into and adding the gas line is pretty straight forward as well. I'll probably need to rent a pipe threader and branch off the line going to the kitchen oven. Probably easiest would be to remove the line to the range temporarily, add the T and rethread it. I did read that you can not branch off a gas line going to a furnace as that must be a dedicated gas line.

And I'm 99% certain and will double check my town has no rules against needing a licensed electrician to do the electric but I'll be sure I'm meeting code as well. I have 2 spare spots in the breaker already and plan to remove the existing 220 line behind the dryer anyway that is not used. Unless code requires both a gas a 220 line ran to the dryer?

And what I'm also still uncertain of, both from a code perspective and general practice is the Dryer exhaust. The simplest is for me to go straight up from the planned basement location and exit the house. But that would place the exhaust vent directly under my kitchen window.

I haven't been able to confirm if an exhaust vent under a window breaks code or not?
 
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Old 05-03-15, 05:35 PM
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One thing about gas lines is, in some places 1/2" is no longer code. It has to be 3/4". So, keep that in mind. Some inspectors want all the pipes changed once you modify what's there. Whatever the story is, verify it before you start.

If you have enough slots in the panel box, don't remove the 220 line. Just add whatever you need. You may need the 220 line in the future.

I'm not sure about the vent under the kitchen window. My guess is that it's okay.
 
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Old 05-03-15, 11:09 PM
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Gas lines really should be handled by a professional and in many states if the gas line is done by an amateur you could be fined. You could also lose your homeowners policy too and in the event of a fire if they find out a gas line was improperly installed they can refuse to pay. While I didn't see anything about a licensed plumber being needed in what building code I could find it doesn't mean it isn't there. Here is an example of some of the testing procedures required that I found for NY state Chapter 4 - Gas Piping Installations

Here is a link to the Department Of Building Standards and Codes which has their contact information Division of Code Enforcement and Administration . As Richard Threthewey of This Old House once said to one of the hosts of the show in reply after he said hey that looks easy let me do some of that. Sure it looks easy and it really is but if I let you do any of this work I lose my license and the homeowner will lose their insurance and have their permit removed.

Afterwards Richards work was inspected and it passed but wouldn't have if he had allowed an unlicensed person to install any gas fittings. Plumbing and even some electric is a different story I encourage people to install that if they feel confident enough. Of course you could have a plumber install the gas line and still have an explosion but if that should happen and I hope it doesn't he is or should be insured so definitely ask for proof of insurance.

I once knew a plumber who after he left a house on a gas job the house exploded but his insurance paid. He however was never seen again as he fled the country in order to avoid being sued. So things like that even happen to the pro's at times and it is why they continually make new rules and require plumbers to keep up to date on newer codes to help keep people safe.
 
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Old 05-04-15, 10:44 AM
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Thank Hedge as well for some great advice.

And I believe (or hope) I'm smart enough to know when I'm in over my head on things. I feel I could do the water lines and electric pretty easy. But ensuring that it is done correctly and meets code is where I do worry sometimes.

And working with gas, again while not overly complex, you want to ensure its done right and up to code. I don't want to blow up myself or home either!!

I plan to speak with my town this week as well in hoping to get more info on what I can do, versus needing a licensed installer for some work, etc.

But I'm still not sure not sure the Exhaust vent, and have been reading that the vent may actually need to at least 3' from any door/window. It seems sorta mixed answers on that both the code reading, and code saying manufacturer's install recommendations are ok.

Here's some links discussing that
Dryer Vent Safety - Int'l Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI)
Dryer/bathroom Vent Terminations And Window Clearances - HVAC - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/st..._15_sec002.htm
 
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Old 05-04-15, 07:55 PM
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I am very glad you will be consulting your towns inspection office they are your very best guide. I have heard so many horror stories concerning gas that I thought I should warn you and I do believe you are a smart person and can handle things. You after all consulted what I believe is the best home improvement forum around and that is smart. Since this will be for gas and not just to vent the dryer I do believe you should not exceed 25 feet and probably should be less but I will admit I am not the expert in dryer ventilation.

One thing though that I have heard and that I saw on one of your links as acceptable was a plastic vent pipe. However that advice is very dangerous and in many jurisdictions the sale of such pipes has been prohibited as the plastic can melt and cause dangerous fumes. I am sure though that you are aware of that as news agencies frequently will warn people as will manufacturers. I personally prefer solid vent pipe made of thin steel and not flexible foil as I believe it is safer and less likely to be perforated and also safer for gas.

Also by code you need to keep a dryer vent fairly far away from any furnace direct venting probably at least as far away as 3' to prevent carbon monoxide from entering your house. I though am not an expert but am giving my best recommendation I can.
 
 

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