new house footing work completed in half way


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Old 06-07-15, 03:01 PM
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new house footing work completed in half way

The builder was constructing the footing for my new house last Friday afternoon. In the middle, because of the huge rain pour, they stopped in half way. So, next Monday, they will come back to finish another half. I read many posts online and some of them pointed out that the concrete work should be finished in one time. Once the concrete dry, it is not right just put another layer on that. Is that true? what should I do to correct this act? I just feel hopeless as the builder won't listen to us.
 
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Old 06-07-15, 03:24 PM
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Welcome to the forums! "half way" as in height, or in length? Cold joints are not really a good thing to have in footings as the entire monolith relies on itself for strength. Our concrete guys will be along to advise more once you tell us which is lacking, vertical or horizontal.
 
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Old 06-07-15, 03:34 PM
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The fully finished half of footing at full height, and then they poured concrete at 1/4 high of all of the remaining. so, basically, when they come back tomorrow, they need to pour concrete on top of that 1/4 dried concrete for the remaining half. Yes, the current poured concrete is almost completely dried.
 
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Old 06-07-15, 03:49 PM
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If that was true workers would have to pour roads and sky scrapers all in one pour. It is not going to happen. I am not a pro (AKA Bridgeman ) but IMO as long as they use a bonding agent and/or pin it together it should not be an issue.
 
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Old 06-07-15, 04:56 PM
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Once the concrete dry, it is not right just put another layer on that
The quote above may have been regarding "skimming" a concrete surface, such as a garage floor. It is true you would not want to add a layer to the top for appearance or any other reason.

Your foundation is different than that scenario, it is tied together with rebar running horizontally and vertically according to local building specs.
 
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Old 06-07-15, 07:03 PM
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When faced with problems like this one, I like to look at them as if they were my own. That is, asking myself what are my options at this point, while not trying to be a pain-in-the a$$ to the builder.

Your builder does not have a lot of quality concrete experience. If he did, he would have emptied the last truck while filling the forms full-depth, and then putting in a temporary bulkhead form at the end-point, to provide a relatively "clean" separation between the two footing pours. And covering everything with plastic to minimize rain damage.

A path forward at this point would be to document everything with as many photos as you can. Including, but not limited to, the condition of all concrete surfaces exposed to rainwater, the condition of the concrete in the partial footing placements, and any other abnormalities that catch the eye as "not looking right." And then ask the builder how he plans to correct the mess that he made. If he says he'll just pour on top of the partially-placed, hardened concrete, tell him that is not acceptable, and that you plan to take your concerns to the lender in the form of a written summary with those photos. The bank is unlikely to allow a construction draw for defective work, which is what you possibly could be faced with. A minimum effort on the builder's part should include applying of an acceptable bonding agent (I personally like a neat, Portland cement slurry, applied just before the wet mud hits the forms) between hardened and fresh concrete, along with drilling/doweling in vertical rebar if none are now present. Contrary to popular opinion, in members carrying such low stresses as foundation footings, a horizontal construction (cold) joint isn't the end of the world--it would be a totally different scenario if this were a member carrying flexural stresses.
 
 

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