Basement window jamb

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Old 09-26-16, 03:27 PM
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Basement window jamb

I am hanging drywall in my basement and I'm trying to figure how to finish the window jamb while maintaining a uniform look with the rest of the room. In the attached picture, A1 is the painted cinder block foundation, angled downward; A2 is also painted concrete foundation; B is a wood stud, which I framed flush with A2; and C is the top jamb which is drywall attached to wood framing with drywall screws.

Any suggestions on how to finish the rest of the jamb? I could just use drywall (glued to concrete and screwed to wood framing) so it can be finished and painted the same as the walls, but my concern is this will create mold issues with the drywall being in direct contact with the foundation, and will ruin the drywall in a short period of time. Is this a legitimate concern? Is there any sort of non-organic material (like composite decking or something) that I could safely attach directly to the foundation without creating any issues and that could be finished and painted to at lest closely resemble the surrounding finished, painted, drywall? What about pressure-treated plywood? Although I read that sanding PT wood to a smooth finished creates a health hazard due to the chemicals released, and it is also difficult to paint.

Also, I'm looking for any tips on how to properly butt up the piece of drywall (or whatever material I should use) on the angled A1 bottom jamb to the vertical drywall below, creating a proper angled outside corner.

Any advice or suggestions is greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 09-26-16, 03:41 PM
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I find it easiest to trim windows with a wood jamb. Basically just build a box that is a little smaller than the opening (I like the look of a stool on bottom) shim the corners so it fits snug, then shoot/screw/or glue it into the opening, apply a face trim to cover the edges.

I also eliminate the angle, since its pointless to mimic it... so I would have brought the bottom drywall up another 2 1/2" or so where its level with the bottom edge of the window. I make the trim symmetrical with the window.
 
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Old 09-28-16, 09:04 AM
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I suppose it would be easier to eliminate the angle, the only reason I kept it is because this window is the only source of natural light in the basement and the angle helps better distribute the light. But either way, I could always build additional framing and fix that if I wanted to.

Besides that, should I be concerned with a wood jamb in direct contact with the foundation? Will this cause potential mold issues down the road?
 
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Old 09-28-16, 10:17 AM
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Usually PT wood is mounted directly to the masonry and then your plywood [or whatever] cover is nailed to the PT.
 
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Old 09-28-16, 11:17 AM
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The wood will not be in direct contact. If you build trim like a box... a little smaller than the opening... like 1/4" smaller, the shims will be the only thing in contact with the cement which is no big deal.
 
 

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