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Purchasing home with rafters separating from main ridge beam

Purchasing home with rafters separating from main ridge beam


  #1  
Old 10-18-16, 03:32 PM
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Purchasing home with rafters separating from main ridge beam

I'm about to close on a property that has about 10 rafters which has separated from the main ridge beam. The inspector came across them during the inspection while reviewing the attic. He basically said it was due to settlement and normal. I probe a bit more and he make it sound like it shouldn't be a big deal. His recommendation is to install simpson strong tie connectors.

The house is a front to back split level home in case that makes a difference.

The puchase contract has been finalized and I'm closing on the property in a few weeks, so it's too late for any type of seller concession. I just want to get an opinion from the experts on whether this is easy work that I can DIY and whether simpson strong tie connectors is the best solution. Additionally, do I need to close these gaps or do I simply attach the simpson strong tie connectors with the existing gaps in place, to prevent further separation?

Thank you
 
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  #2  
Old 10-18-16, 03:46 PM
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There is likely no way to draw them together. The rafters are probably bowed, and it's likely the fascia... possibly the exterior walls... are bowed as well. Ceiling joist connection could be suspect too, you would want to check it out. Adding a collar tie on both sides (bolted) right below the ridge would be a sufficient fix, imo, which would prevent it from going any further. A Simpson strap across the bottoms would also work, but that's a lot of nails.
 
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Old 10-18-16, 04:32 PM
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Thanks Xsleeper. The inspector didn't mention anything regarding the exterior walls bowing, so I pray they're not.

However there were a few vertical cracks in the pour foundation of the exterior walls which were visible when inspecting the basement. My inspector stated they are normal settlement cracks.
 
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Old 10-18-16, 04:49 PM
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The space created between the rafter and the ridge went somewhere. Either the opposite end of the rafter has slipped where it is nailed into the end of the ceiling joist / exterior wall top plate, or the whole exterior wall has moved out of plumb or the rafter is now very bowed (such as from too many layers of shingles) or some of all three.
 
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Old 10-18-16, 06:41 PM
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And who hired the inspector? Was he recommended by the Real Estate company? IF so, he is there to facilitate a sale, not protect you. Beware. These anomalies are not "normal".
 
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Old 10-18-16, 07:12 PM
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Chandler, the inspector is someone I've used before and not recommended by the realtor.

Based on the feedback so far, I'm wondering why he said it is normal and starting to really second guess this purchase. Again, the contract is already finalized and I've already put down the 10% deposit, so a bit too late to walk away or ask for a concession from seller to remediate the issue.
 
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Old 10-18-16, 07:17 PM
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I just had to make sure. Many people go with Realtor suggested inspectors, and find out too late that things were overlooked, or not flagged on the inspection since the object of the inspection is to make a sale. At least do the collar tie thing to keep it from spreading further. You may can run 4" screws from the opposite side of the ridge into the rafter head at an angle to "maybe" pull it to, but I doubt it.
 
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Old 10-18-16, 09:01 PM
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Xsleeper/Chandler, you had mentioned that adding collar ties should be a sufficient fix. Is a regular contractor able to do that work? And should the collar ties be added to all rafters or only the ones that are separated?

Thanks
 
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Old 10-19-16, 02:42 AM
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Yes, anyone with good carpenter skills can install the collar ties. Add the ties to each rafter set.
 
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Old 10-19-16, 06:21 AM
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OK, will have my contractor install collar ties on every rafter combo, and not simply the ones that are separating or every other rafter (which seems to be the normal practice that I'm reading online).

Is there a particular location on the rafter where it should be installed? Such as immediately under the ridge vs. 1/3 way down vs. 1/2 way down?

And will installing both collar ties and some type of Simpson strong tie or hurricane tie be overkill?

Thanks again
 
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Old 10-19-16, 06:27 AM
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Hurricane ties wont work where its gapped away since you wont be able to put nails in all the holes.
 
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Old 10-19-16, 03:52 PM
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Is there a need to bring in a structural engineer for what I'm describing or simply have a decent contractor come in to work on the collar ties?
 
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Old 10-19-16, 04:04 PM
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IMO this is a fairly simple fix that you could do yourself if you wanted to. Like I mentioned, I would put them right under the ridge, it's simple, uses the least materials to accomplish it's purpose. A "collar tie" just needs to be in the upper 1/3 of the span. But you aren't doing this for standard reasons.

If you wanted to make a repair that would both look good and hide the gap (future inspectors will see the repair) you could cut 3/4 plywood triangles that are maybe 4'' long, notch for the ridge, the glue and screw them onto each side right in the peak. This would appear more like a gusset.
 
 

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