Building a wall over laminate flooring


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Old 02-07-17, 05:40 AM
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Building a wall over laminate flooring

Hello, I have an already finished basement in my raised ranch style home.
It really is a giant open room 25' by ~30' feet 100% open and we want to break it in half and add a bedroom/ half bath and small storage area out of half of the space.

Is it not proper or safe to put the walls on top of laminate pergo style wood flooring? We would be using concrete anchors through the studs and flooring into the cement below. I am concerned about this being a floating floor anchored down..

We were thinking what kind of fun it would be to have to cut out the flooring for the walls and in the process we would probably be cutting through the plastic membrane and possibly damaging the cement or tool used to cut through. It would also be a challenge to do that and make sure the slots line up with the ceiling joists and also avoid cutting out where the doors are.

I have noticed about an inch different in the floor to ceiling measurement along parts of the walls that will be placed if that helps the recommendation any.

We figure 20 years down the road if we ever need to replace the flooring we would worry about it then and cut up against the 2x4 walls and remove flooring. At least for that 20 years in the meantime the moisture membrane would be unharmed and we would be able to put a new one down and overlap it upwards a bit.


Is there a better way?


Floor plan (things have moved a bit to line up with joists):
Home design and decorating ideas to get inspired and get expert tips

Photos of area:
https://goo.gl/photos/WRV9xyvnRpzDPUCN7
https://goo.gl/photos/s5V5FixCX4jMACGn6
 

Last edited by Dana Francey; 02-07-17 at 06:01 AM.
  #2  
Old 02-07-17, 05:44 AM
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Lay your bottom plate on the laminate where it needs to go and mark each side, then set your saw to just barely go thru the laminate and cut. It doesn't hurt for slightly more laminate to be removed than needed for the stud wall as the wall covering and base board will hide it. Same thing for the jamb at the door.
 
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Old 02-07-17, 06:03 AM
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Doing it the way your suggesting would be a sure way to have that floor decouple because it can no longer expand and contract.
Even as simple a mistake as hitting the floor when nailing the 1/4 round or shoe molding can cause this issue.
When laying out where the bottom plate will go, hold the pencil flat against the 2 X 4, not at an angle.
That will allow for the needed gap for expansion.
 
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Old 02-07-17, 07:40 AM
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So, followup questions:

I have to place the bottom plate location exactly under the top plate which will be installed first based on the ceiling joists. My blue tape in the pictures is just a pretty accurate estimate using a plum bob but it isn't 100% dead on. How do I align the bottom place exactly under it? I have to build the wall in place and not on the floor and tip it up because the ceiling height varies too much, but I am still a little lost on how to align it correctly.

What tool would be best to cut this? A circular saw with standard blade with the depth set exactly at the laminate floor depth? Is that risky with cement underneath?

If I am removing the current flooring, should I be using pressure treated 2x4's as the bottom plate against the concrete?
 
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Old 02-07-17, 07:56 AM
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If your top plate is installed, cut a 2x4 to fit under it on each end, tight to the floor. Plumb that stud, then mark it's location on the floor. Do that on each side. Remove those studs. Then you will have marks to locate your bottom plate. Use a brand new carbide blade, yes, set the depth at exactly the depth of the laminate... no more. If you set the depth right, you won't hit concrete. Hit the concrete and your blade is done. You will be cutting out at least a 4" wide slot for a 3 1/2" wide 2x4. With drywall on both sides, you could even cut out 5". As long as you have at least 1/4" of room for the flooring to expand and contract everywhere.
 
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Old 02-07-17, 08:58 AM
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Thanks for the info everyone.

Just to clarify - we are talking about using a circular saw, correct?
 
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Old 02-07-17, 09:01 AM
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Yes.......................
 
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Old 02-12-17, 11:05 AM
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One other thought:

If I end up cutting through the plastic vapor barrier - should I replace it before setting pressure treated 2x4's down at the bottom plate?
 
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Old 02-12-17, 11:11 AM
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I'd just tape it. mmmmmmmmmm
 
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Old 02-12-17, 11:31 AM
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Well that just makes too much sense. Derp

Thanks
 
 

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