Dehumidifier Water Removal Solutions

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Old 09-07-17, 04:48 AM
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Dehumidifier Water Removal Solutions

Hello - I am hopeful someone might have a solution for me. I used to run my basement humidifier into a condensate pump and pump it into the same pipe that my washer drains. However, my local sewer authority enacted a new code that prohibits pumping any "created" water into the sewer. Basically they only want to treat the water that comes into the house. I understand their reasoning and that is fine.

I am looking into options as to how to remove my humidifier water now other than emptying the bucket every few days. However, I don't have a basement floor drain. I've looked into just pumping it to the outside of the house into the yard but I've been told that I run the risk of this water freezing in the winter and backing up which could cause greater issues. I'm really stumped as to my options other than just manually emptying the bucket. Has anyone else encountered this and if so how did you solve it? Thank you!
 
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Old 09-07-17, 06:32 AM
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My condensate pump line exits through the basement wall onto gravel. The pipe is pitched downward from its highest point (inside) so when the pump cuts off the line empties itself and there's nothing to freeze. A sump pit is even better but I assume you'd do that if you had one.

BTW I wouldn't be so okay with such a code. Its clear they don't want to treat "unmetered" water because they can't charge you for it. Give me a break--condensate pumps are a harmless minor source. I can understand them not wanting rain gutters emptying into the sewers.
 
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Old 09-07-17, 07:02 AM
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Thank you guy48065! That is something for me to look into! I have concrete poured walls and concrete floor. I could look into drilling through. I wouldn't think that would compromise the floor or wall. Thanks for the input though!

Yeah, I think you're right...they don't want to treat unmetered water. I wouln't think my humidifier water would tax their system as well but I'm at their mercy I guess. Thank you again!
 
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Old 09-07-17, 07:34 AM
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Your title says dehumidifier but the topic seems to be "humidifier". Assuming that, a good approach is to eliminate the need for the extra moisture. Clarify which we are talking about, freezing water supports a winter issue which normally involves adding moisture and a humidifier.

Bud
 
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Old 09-07-17, 08:06 AM
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Dehumidifiers don't typically get run when temperatures outside are approaching or below freezing. Can you elaborate why you still need to run yours then?
 
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Old 09-07-17, 12:11 PM
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It seems that the words humidifier and dehumidifier were both used for a dehumidifier problem.

Those codes were enacted to keep the sump pumps from being discharged into the sanitary sewer system. This could amount to hundreds of gallons of water. The "under a gallon a day" from the dehumidifier is inconsequential.

As mentioned.... a dehumidifier is not usually run in freezing weather but even if it was..... the small amount of discharge wouldn't present very much of an icing problem. The line freezing would be the problem.
 
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Old 09-08-17, 03:09 AM
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Follow up

Thank you to everyone for your input! I apologize for any confusion I caused. Hopefully I can clarify...

I am looking for another solution to emptying my dehumidifier rather than by just manually emptying the bucket. I thought of maybe running the dehumidifier into a pump then having it pump to the outside of the house. I spoke with a contractor and he said that pumping water to the outside could run the risk of water freezing in the line in winter as it exits the house which would then back up and cause leaking.

True...my dehumidifier doesn't run much in winter so it would stand to reason that my freezing pipe issue may be low but I have noticed it does kick on during winter at times. Maybe that is my issue? I should just unplug it during the winter? At what temperature should I no longer run a dehumidifier?

In any case I was hopeful I would hear of another solution(s) to dehumidifier water removal than just manually emptying the tank. Maybe there isn't? Thank you again for everyone's input!
 
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Old 09-08-17, 03:39 AM
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As soon as temps fall below the mid sixties I turn off my dehumidifier. The few times that the humidity might be high be high in cool weather is minor. Besides, in my case the furnace is located in the bnasement and any residua; heat will take care of any latent moisture.
 
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Old 09-08-17, 04:25 AM
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Thanks Norm201! I appreciate your input!
 
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Old 09-08-17, 10:53 AM
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I think Norm is right - as soon as I switch from AC to heat, I turn off my dehumidifier.
 
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