Exterior door framing ideas


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Old 08-09-18, 09:09 AM
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Exterior door framing ideas

In the course of repairing water damage from a deck that someone built without proper flashing, I discovered that the basement walkout exterior door isn't framed correctly.
This is a load bearing wall, but it only has a 2x6 as the header that is laid flat vs on end.
Door is 36 inch wide, and top of frame is 85 1/4 inches. That leaves just 3 1/4 inches to bottom of the joists. Looking for ideas on how to structurally fix this. Thanks.
 

Last edited by Crosent344; 08-09-18 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 08-09-18, 09:20 AM
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Welcome to the forums! .....mamaybe a piece of angle iron?
 
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Old 08-09-18, 09:21 AM
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Its not necessarily wrong... depending on which way the floor joists run. Your rim joist carries the load across the opening. If the joists are parallel to the exterior wall, the single rim joist (your wall bottom plate sits on this) is sufficient.

If the joists happen to be perpendicular to the exterior wall, that rim joist can be doubled to act as a header for any floor joists that lay directly above the door opening. You would double the rim joist between the existing joists that land on the foundation. So the doubled portion might need to be 46 1/2" long or so. You can cut back the existing joists with a sawzall or oscillating tool. Replace the rim from the exterior side. Put the joists into hangers on the back side.

The door will still be framed like it currently is in either case.
 
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Old 08-09-18, 09:49 AM
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XSleeper that is a great idea thank you.
 
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Old 08-16-18, 05:19 PM
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New issue


When I pulled the old exterior door the sill plate that the Jack stud rests on doesn't have much concrete block under it. Trying to decide if I should run the Jack stud to the concrete floor or try to replace part of the concrete block under the sill plate. Not sure if the pictures show I'm having trouble getting them to work. This is a load-bearing wall and the studs run perpendicular to the face of the door.
 
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Old 08-16-18, 05:38 PM
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Yeah, pictures might help. Paste the link to them or upload them as an attachment. (Paperclip icon).
 
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Old 08-16-18, 07:49 PM
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pictures

Name:  basement1.jpg
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Size:  20.2 KBName:  basement 2.jpg
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Size:  14.3 KBHere are some pictures of my latest situation...
The exterior door had jack studs that rested on the top of the sill plate that sits on the blocks.
One issue is the left side sill is rotted. If I replace a section, what is a reasonable length-would 6 ft be sufficient?
Second issue is that the block under the sill wood is crumbled away. With no support under it, wondering what options I have. Would I be able to run the jack stud all the way to the floor if I used treated? Not sure i can swap out that concrete block.
The wall inside the basement is my support wall holding things up while I'm replacing the rotted wood.
 
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Old 08-16-18, 08:15 PM
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I would say a minimum of 4'. Have the splice between studs so that you can epoxy a 1/2" anchor in both ends... and on the old plate end. You can leave the plate short and run a stud to the ground but yes, that stud should be treated if you do that. Or you could leave the plate long and just have a short piece of treated under the plate. All depends on the width you have and the width you need.

On the right side I would just get whats loose off there and mortar that side up with mortar mix as long as it won't be over 2" thick.

If you replace plate you will want a sill sealer underneath it as a gasket. 1/2" bolts a maximum of every 6ft is code. No more than 12" from plate ends at doorways and from splices. Square washers and nuts.
 
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Old 08-18-18, 01:12 PM
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Making good progress swapping out the rotted sill an rim joist sections.
What is the recommended distance I should keep the rim spaces and sill spaces from each other? currently they are about 4 feet from prior construction, is that enough?

Also, I kind of hate to bring this up since I'm about half done, but wondering if I should have been thinking about doubling up the 4x6 single sill on the top of the wall section. Looks like some houses have 2 rows of the 4x6. Will i be ok with just the single 4x6? Here's pic of what that looks like on the wall I'm working on.
 
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