Build walls in place or stand up?

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Old 12-14-18, 10:05 AM
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Build walls in place or stand up?

Installing 2x4 walls in the basement over 2" insulation, then S/R over the walls.
Question is: will it be easier to build the walls flat on the floor and stand them up and tap into place, or install the top and bottom plate first and fit the 2xs between the plates?
 
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Old 12-14-18, 10:11 AM
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Much depends on how lever floor and ceiling are. When building a new house the deck is close to perfectly flat so a wall built laying down can be lifted and nailed in place and also be perfect.

Review what you need for fire blocking and be sure to air seal and insulate the rim before you hide it behind the new wall.

Bud
 
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Old 12-14-18, 10:50 AM
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I would personally build them on the floor then stand them up. I hate toenailing, which you would be doing a lot of if you built the wall in place.
 
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Old 12-14-18, 12:25 PM
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I'd also build them on the floor and then erect them. Be sure to give your self enough room to stand them up. Generally it's easier to build them like that and then add lumber to the top plate to make up the difference.
 
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Old 12-14-18, 12:50 PM
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You build them on the floor 1 1/2" shorter than the height needed. That gives you room to tilt them up then place small pieces of 2x4's across the top to tie in your walls to the above floor joists.

Sorry marksr, I didnt read your entire content and pretty much just repeated!
 
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Old 12-14-18, 01:02 PM
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I usually just build the wall to size then whack it in place with a sledge
 
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Old 12-14-18, 01:48 PM
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It's a lot less frustrating to build them shy and then shim the top. Force works sometimes but often it causes other issues.
 
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Old 12-14-18, 04:25 PM
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It's a lot less frustrating to build them shy and then shim the top
Yes, when your building a 20' wall and trying to stand up yourself a sledge hammer can be tough to work!
 
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Old 12-14-18, 07:15 PM
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I build them as a stand alone if in an existing structure. Use a plumb bob to get your measurements correct, nail up the top plate and then leave the bottom loose initially. Cut your studs a fraction long so you have to beat them into place for a tight fit. Then nail them off. Adjust the plumb and then nail the bottom plate to the slab with power shots. Toe nailing is not a problem if you have a compressor and a framing nailer.
 
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Old 12-15-18, 05:37 AM
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I'll be using a compressor and framing nailer, and planning to build it in 8' sections... beating anything into place makes me nervous in an older house, so I'll prob be shimming the top after raising the sections. thanks
 
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