New Home owner, lots of basement work

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-16-19, 02:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
New Home owner, lots of basement work

I have recently purchased a '69 raised ranch as our first home. Unbeknownst to us, it has a history of water intrusion and has been gutted a number of times due to mold damage. None of this was disclosed and the home inspection didn't reveal anything of any significance.

We stripped off 4' of paneling to find patched drywall with varying degrees of water damage and mold growth (typically up 6-7" of the board). We've pulled it all and treated everything in sight with mold control and have dried it as well as we could and replaced with mold resistant drywall wtih a 3/4" gap between the flooring and the drywall which wasn't there before. Still have to put in some dehumidfiers. We also had a french drain installed along the front wall (the only wall that is under grade) with a sump in the garage. No water issues since then.

I'm starting to redo things now, and have some questions about rebuilding part of the stairs. I've never done any home reno so this all new to me. This is the wall next to the stair case (can see the concrete-covered trench to the right and the polyboard over the block wall).

Name:  b1.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  14.8 KB

I'd 'like' to open this up to the landing at the front door (marked in blue) but I was told it's load bearing. This is a pic of the top of the 3 2x4's at the base of the stairs and the joists. If I can't, it's not a big deal. I'll just keep it as is.
Name:  b2a.jpg
Views: 84
Size:  18.6 KB

Name:  b2b.jpg
Views: 79
Size:  16.5 KB

I want to tear these stairs out and replace them as the stringers are pretty beat up. I'd also like to have a 3rd stringer in the middle. I'm just not sure how to go about doing all this. Started pulling off the carpet here. I don't know if i should replace the 2x4's as they seem to be pretty solid despite the staining. I'd welcome any advice.

Name:  b3.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  17.2 KB

So far, I've got my basement bathroom and laundry room almost done. Lotta little flaws I'm not fond of but not bad for a first time I don't think. It looked just as rough as the rest of the basement did. Put LVP over the existing tile as well. Still need to finish some details and put a vanity in.

Name:  b4.jpg
Views: 79
Size:  7.6 KB

Name:  b5.jpg
Views: 82
Size:  6.6 KB
 

Last edited by PJmax; 05-16-19 at 04:15 PM. Reason: imported/resized pictures (added closeup - #3)
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-16-19, 04:16 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,729
Received 345 Votes on 323 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

I imported your pictures to your storage area. They'll always remain here with your thread.
 
  #3  
Old 05-17-19, 09:17 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,406
Received 23 Votes on 21 Posts
Hi gps and welcome to the forum.

Unfortunately I can't help with either the moisture issue or the stairs but will add a link for information.
https://www.buildingscience.com/docu...ts?full_view=1

For your moisture problem in my opinion the basement should never have been finished. I do energy work where MY infrared camera can detect moisture problems hidden behind walls and too many basements have a problem much bigger than what they can see. Some insurance companies exclude mold damage and the results are terrible. Left exposed with no wood to feed the mold it does not get out of control.

I know, impossible to rip it all out but be aware you are headed down an expensive and difficult road. All moisture, both liquid and moisture vapor needs to be eliminated or controlled before any finish work is done.

My apology but experience says I should share this opinion. Others may be more optimistic so wait for their advice.

Bud
 
PJmax voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 05-17-19, 12:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Heya man. Thanks for the response and input. From what we can tell the only moisture issue was from the intrusion. Nobody seemed to address the root cause which was leaks in the foundation where the block meets the slab on the wall that’s below grade when the water table gets high with long periods of rain. Since putting the drain & pump in, the water intrusion issue is gone. So we’re essentially rolling the dice.
 
  #5  
Old 05-17-19, 12:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,406
Received 23 Votes on 21 Posts
Without talking to your insurance company carefully read your policy related to any mold. Some fine tune that decision to define who caused the problem, which finishing a basement might be a cause. Policies vary all over the place.

Be aware that there are two types of moisture, liquid water and moisture vapor. The water passes through cracks and gaps and can slowly soak through concrete, but moisture vapor passes right through concrete in all directions. The physics is that vapor moves from high concentrations to low concentrations and the soil outside is always a higher source than your interior. When that vapor runs into a vapor barrier it accumulates until the level matches the outside, usually higher than you want and high enough to support unwanted growth.

One common conclusion the experts voice is better to dry to the inside than accumulate.

Enough of my chatter so I'll wish you the best.

Bud
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: