Structural advice needed

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Old 06-25-19, 08:24 PM
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Structural advice needed

I am in need of some professional advice and help on some structural problems I'm having. My family owns a lake house that I believe was built in the 40's (that's 1940's). The house is built from block and must sit on some very sturdy footings (not 1 settlement crack in the block). One major problem is that the house was built basically at ground level with a crawlspace underneath. The lack of a sump pump for a very long time has deteriorated the floors and the beams in the crawlspace. We have torn out the old floor and replaced the rotten joists and subflooring in the main living area and were very surprised of the type of construction. Like I said before this is a 1-1/2 story block home. The floors are supported by beam (joist) pockets with a floor joist then centrally supported by a double beam underneath in the crawlspace. This is where it's a little strange to me... the exterior and interior walls dont seem to be sagging whatsoever and seem unattached as the floors creep lower into the crawlspace. I don't understand this phenomenon. Now, I have seen the water table be as high here as to lick the bottom of the 2x8 floor joists so this is as high as it gets. What is the most sensible fix? We (the family) were thinking maybe the fix is to tear out all the non bearing walls otherwise gut the interior and redo the plumbing in plastic and pex and basically fill the crawl with sand and cap with Crete. Then rebuild interior walls and finish as needed. Are we off the rocker here or is there a better way to save the old place? Please note that tearing the place down really isn't an option considering the crazy building restrictions on lakefront homes in Michigan. Any respectful response will be respectfully considered, thank you.
 
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Old 06-25-19, 08:43 PM
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Gutting the walls and getting rid of the crawl space will be a good idea. You will want to compact the sand that you use to fill, and then cover it with rigid insulation prior to pouring your slab floor. Also ensure that the perimeter of the slab gets insulated so that you don't have cold radiating in from the edges of the pad.

And then you would be wise to install drain tile in a sock (assuming its buried in clean fill sand) and a couple sump basins with insulated lids in an accessible location to provide drainage for that high water table.
 
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Old 06-26-19, 05:12 AM
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The only thing I might change would be to use clean, crushed stone as fill instead of sand. In my area sand is not permitted as fill but clean, crushed stone such as #57 or #78 is even permitted as fill under footers. And don't forget a vapor barrier or two. I would also leave some space between the joists and concrete to allow for airflow.
 
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Old 06-26-19, 05:28 AM
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The crushed stone would be best. But if I'm picturing it correctly he wouldn't need any joists once he's done... it would be like a slab on grade.
 
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