Replacement of brick basement floor?

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Old 07-31-19, 10:27 PM
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Replacement of brick basement floor?

Hi,

I'm trying to find options to the problem I'm having with my house and its brick basement floor in my house that was originally built in 1906. As you can see from the pictures, I have a lot of seepage that keeps coming up through the ground (in one picture where the brick floor is very dirty, that's where during a long stretch of rain it pooled on the floor it had that much seepage), what I'm wondering is what my options might be. I saw that there's an older thread that was started several years ago and the guy on it seemed to be in the same boat I'm in.

I have two sump pumps in the basement (pretty sure that the house got a lot of water under it at one time or another) and that there is some hokey fixes that bring water that is usually a major area that water comes in through the foundation and channels it to one of the sump pumps. I mean, as a temporary forever solution, it works, but I would like to make this area more usable. (The bottom image that I used my flash on, is the dark room off to the left side where the "channel" picture to the sump pump is located. I think its water that is seeping around the sewer outlet, but its not the sewer since there doesn't seem to be a smell from the water that comes in and its pretty dry right now.)

The walls were painted on with some UGL drylock or something similar and I don't seem to see any seepage coming through from the walls, but definitely from the floor

Here's a link to that old thread:

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/b...ent-floor.html

That thread had a lot of good ideas and information, but I wasn't sure how feasible it would be in my case and I'd also like to know if that OP (if he's reading this) from that original thread came up with a solution.

Thanks

(Hopefully the images aren't too small to see, if they are I can upload larger ones if need be).
 
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Old 08-01-19, 05:44 AM
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I would not try addressing a water problem from inside the home. By that point the water is already inside and you've lost. I would do the usual basement water treatment of making sure the house has gutters and the downspouts lead well away from the house. The ground should be graded to direct surface water away from the home. A perimeter drain and water/damp proofing of the foundation walls also needs to be done to intercept any water before it gets to the home.
 
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Old 08-01-19, 10:14 AM
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Alright, yeah I think later this year when its not quite as hot out I'm going to try and do some landscaping that might help with this problem. I do have several gutter downspouts that reach out around 5 feet or a little more from the foundation, but I'll try and add more. I have seen during real heavy rain that there are some areas that definitely need to be angled more from the house (near an exterior sidewalk next to the house, where it's relatively flat and the water pretty much pools up).
 
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Old 08-01-19, 10:45 AM
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Since I have a slight sag in the house (very slight but I can see it in the trim in the 1st floor near a stairwell) could I build some sort of pier on top of the brick, or would I need to dig a portion of brick out so I could make a more traditional pier. Again, the sag is very slight but I don't want to let it get away from me. I'm pretty new to all this so if I'm asking a stupid question, that's pretty much the reason.

Oh... and another reason I'm trying to find a better way to keep the moisture out of the house, is because the past owners had their mother living there and she suffered from COPD. Since she had such lung problems, they had someone come in and staple a lot of black plastic moisture barrier around under the first floor (the ceiling in the basement) to block mold from coming up. It's really annoying if you need to work on anything because you need to pull it all down to get to anything then staple it back up. I have checked several spots (even when there was water in the basement) and I didn't notice any moisture above the plastic. I'm pretty sure this was another so-so fix to a problem, but maybe I'm wrong and it was the best and cheapest solution.

Since, the central air blower unit is in the basement, the moisture from the floor is creating condensate on my blower unit or heat exchanger (not sure of the term) and its getting my insulation around air vents wet, which I know I need to get fixed. I thought about buying that mylar radiant insulation and replacing the old stuff, but wasn't sure if that would be a waste or not.

I have several windows that I have propped open to help air out the basement, but since I'm in southeast Kansas we have fairly humid weather in the summer (especially this year). I'm not sure if I'm helping the problem by airing out the basement or just simply adding to my frustration. Would it be better to put in a (or couple) of dehumidifiers to help with this issue as well.

I realize I'm making a bigger post about different things and I'm not trying to be annoying or handheld but I thought I would see what anyone would know about this and shoot some ideas I could try.

Again, thanks for the input!
 
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Old 08-01-19, 10:48 AM
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Your brick floor isn't adequate to carry the load any support post would have. You need to excavate and pour concrete where the post would go.
 
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Old 08-01-19, 10:50 AM
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If doing any more basement or crawl space encapsulation it's well worth it to get the proper material. The stuff I use is 12 mil thick with a mesh reinforcement bonded into the plastic material but it's available in different weights/thicknesses. It's white on one side which makes a basement much brighter and the heavier weight and mesh makes it much more durable. The stronger material also allows you to pull it tight when installing so you have a much flatter ceiling. Then you use a Polyethylene tape to seal all the joints, around the perimeter, ducting and wires for an air tight installation.
 
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Old 08-01-19, 11:29 AM
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Alright, thanks again guys for the information.

I'll keep a lot of this in mind when I get the chance to start working on this stuff.
 
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