Rebuilding wall after mold remediation

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Old 12-11-19, 03:45 PM
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Rebuilding wall after mold remediation

So I had to have the corner wall torn down in my basement because I found mold under the panelling. Now since that's done I have to repair and finish it. I'm not to knowledgeable about this type of thing so I wanted to outline how I think things will go to make sure I'm not missing anything.
  1. cut the 2x4 to length for the floor plate. Use treated lumber.
  2. Use a hammer drill to predrill anchors through the floor plate into the wall
  3. Liquid nail the end of the floor plates together as well as the stud bottoms.
  4. Use tapcon screws to anchor the floor plate to the wall
  5. Bracket the studs to the floor plate
  6. Sister stud corner studs with wood screws and attach to floor plate using brackets
  7. Install solid foam insulation
 
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Old 12-11-19, 06:03 PM
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If you were using rigid foam insulation, I would recommend installing that first, taping seams and using sealant as appropriate against the wall and then building your stud wall against that. In my area one would typically not want the studs to be directly in contact with the concrete wall. Some will even set down a thin foam strip beneath the bottom plate to creat a thermal break between the concrete floor. The studs would be screwed into the bottom and top plate, not into the concrete wall. The less glues you can use, the less food there is for mold and mildew.
 
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Old 12-11-19, 08:36 PM
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Agreed. Foam against the wall first, sealing all edges.

Also, no reason to use any glue on framing, you can if you want to but it's unnecessary. Tapcons go into the floor, not the wall. No idea what bracket you are talking about. Studs get toenailed into the top and bottom plates. Corner studs that are sistered get nailed together every 16".
 
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Old 12-11-19, 08:51 PM
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Thanks for the replies they are super helpful. I'm going to add some pics so you can see what's already there. Instead of tapcon what should I use? The studs are already against the wall so should I still use the solid foam?
 
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Old 12-11-19, 09:00 PM
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Well it explains why you had mold. So unless you rip all that off and start over putting the foam on first, and frame it out with a 2x4 wall it will likely just get moldy again.
 
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Old 12-11-19, 09:20 PM
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Yah I figured. I dont have much for choices so I kind of have to go with what I got. I wish I can go back and do it right but I dont have the funds for that. So with that how can I minimize things? The gutters had an issue which lead to the incident but that has been rectified luckily. They used the fibrous insulation should I just go with that? Should I brush flex seal on it to seal some moisture out? They anchored the floor plate to the wall instead of the floor, looks like it's a 24 on its side, what should I use to anchor it? Thanks for all the replies I know it's not an ideal basement wall but your help is very valuable to this know nothing.
 
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Old 12-11-19, 09:29 PM
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If you have to stick with what you've got, use tight fitting 1 1/2 rigid foam between studs and get the wide Styrofoam seam tape and tape over your studs to seal all the foam edges. When you put drywall up caulk the drywall to the bottom plate to eliminate drafts. Either use foam gasket under the bottom plate or construction adhesive all gaps.
 
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Old 12-11-19, 09:34 PM
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Cant say thank you enough, feeling more confident about getting this done. Is it ok that the floor plate is not attached to the wall and is floating there? As you can tell I'm really worried about that.
 
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Old 12-11-19, 09:38 PM
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Like I mentioned earlier, Tapcon it to the floor. If your studs won't meet in the inside corners, spray foam the gap between them. Use mold resistant drywall. It's usually purple.
 
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Old 12-12-19, 11:36 AM
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When you say tape over studs with styrofoam seam tape do you mean to include the studs such as taping the foam to the studs or around the studs? Wierd question but even harder to describe
 
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Old 12-12-19, 11:44 AM
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Yes, tape over the face of the stud to air seal the foam edges on either side of that stud. The Styrofoam tape (Dow Weathermate construction tape) is wide enough to do this. @ 2 7/8" wide.
 
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Old 12-12-19, 11:48 AM
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Great, I'll 8nclude the stud by taping across the face that is against the concrete wall. Should I glue the foam board to the concrete wall?
 
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Old 12-12-19, 11:51 AM
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No need to. If you cut it tight it will stay there... The tape will hold it in place until the drywall is up. This assumes you use 1 1/2" foam that will be more or less flush with the front of the stud.

It works best to cut the foam on a table saw using an abrasive blade.
 
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Old 12-13-19, 12:34 PM
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So the studs are roughly 2x2s. I cant seem to find pressure treated one so are unPT 2x2s ok to use? They are right against the concrete
 
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Old 12-13-19, 01:19 PM
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You don't own a saw?

..???
 
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Old 12-13-19, 04:06 PM
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I do, a circular saw. Might be a bit tricky to cut long ways but I'll make it work. Instead of using tapcon what about ramset. Seems like it would be easier since I wont have to rent a hammer drill.
 
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Old 12-13-19, 05:29 PM
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It can split the board but you could try. And only if you are nailing into the floor. You don't want to use powder tools on concrete block.
 
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