Bathroom rough-ins


  #1  
Old 01-20-20, 11:09 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bathroom rough-ins

Hello!
I have an interesting situation. I plan to add a full bathroom in my basement (toilet , sink, bathtub) but the rough-ins available only have 2 pipes:
Name:  IMG_20191014_155130edit.jpg
Views: 373
Size:  1.53 MB

I can only assume that 1 is for the sink drain and 2 is for the toilet. However there is nothing visible for the tub. I called the city offices to see if they happen to have the plans (15year old house) and they told me that they only keep plans for a year.
So, the issue is, how to determine if the bathtub rough-in is present and just hiding under a very thin layer of concrete? I guess I can break in the concrete, but I just don't want to break anything unnecessarily. Any pointers/ideas?

The other issue is that the width from plumbing wall to the opposite wall is 6ft as they lay, but I have been reading that it is supposed to be 5ft. It is not a major issue (just losing a foot for the other room) and I am thinking on using 2x6 on those 2 walls to account for pipes.

Any thoughts?
 
  #2  
Old 01-20-20, 02:59 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,170
Received 2,272 Upvotes on 2,024 Posts
You mention a 6' dimension between two walls... but you don't have any walls. Why would you construct your new walls 12" further apart than you want? If you want the bathroom walls to be 5' apart why aren't you building them 5' apart?

To locate the tub or shower rough in one method is to clear everything out of the area. Look for slight discolorations, bumps or dips. Anything out of the ordinary that might indicate something is below. If you can't see anything then I'd use a 2x4 held vertically. Tap on the floor in a search pattern with the 2x4. Most of the floor should have a consistent solid sound but if a tub/shower was roughed in you should hear a hollow sound when you hit that area.

What is the diameter of pipe #2?

Look up at the ceiling in the bathroom area. Do you have a vent line for the addition?
 
  #3  
Old 01-20-20, 06:00 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
You mention a 6' dimension between two walls... but you don't have any walls. Why would you construct your new walls 12" further apart than you want? If you want the bathroom walls to be 5' apart why aren't you building them 5' apart?
My apologies, I should have added that I was planning on matching the end of the stairs. I found what basically is my basement and added what I am hoping to accomplish:
Name:  basement_edit.jpg
Views: 177
Size:  189.4 KB
I hope this makes more sense as to why I said it is 6' apart. I want to make it match/flush to the end of the stairs.

What is the diameter of pipe #2?
The diameter of pipe #2 is just under 4" and for pipe 1 is 2.5"

Look up at the ceiling in the bathroom area. Do you have a vent line for the addition?
Thanks for bringing this up. There is no vent line visible. If you look at the new image, yellow is basically how the upstairs (main floor) is configured. It is a big space with kitchen (left), dinning (middle), and living room (right).
I was thinking about suing an AAV on the sink drain line for ventilation.

I added the other pipes that go down under the basement concrete from the main and second floor. Pipe #3 is from the main floor and is a half bath, #4 is from the main floor kitchen sink, #5 is from the second floor full bath, and #6 is from the second floor master bathroom (#7 is drain in utility room).

Hope this helps clarify/add to my situation.
 
  #4  
Old 01-21-20, 04:47 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,170
Received 2,272 Upvotes on 2,024 Posts
Since you will have a tub/shower and a toilet in the basement you can NOT use an AAV. You must have a proper, piped plumbing vent. If the basement ceiling is insulated pull down the insulation in the area above the rough-ins. Hopefully you will find a capped off pipe in the ceiling space. Look hard because if you don't find it you will have to somehow run a new vent line.

Making the bathroom 6' wide isn't too much trouble. How to handle it with a tub depends on the surround you choose. If you're going to use a fiberglass surround kit I would frame out a 12" dead space or tiny closet at the end of the tub creating a 60" opening for the tub and surround. If you will doing tile I would frame a 12" wide shelf at the end of the tub and tile it with the surround.

Purchase your tub and surround before you start framing the walls. Some are too large to fit through a doorway so you'll need to make sure whatever you buy will fit down the stairwell to the basement and can be gotten into the bathroom. In new construction the tub & surround are often put into the bathroom before the walls are built. You will also want to know exactly how big a rough opening your tub and surround you will need.
 
  #5  
Old 01-21-20, 06:07 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Since you will have a tub/shower and a toilet in the basement you can NOT use an AAV. You must have a proper, piped plumbing vent. If the basement ceiling is insulated pull down the insulation in the area above the rough-ins. Hopefully you will find a capped off pipe in the ceiling space. Look hard because if you don't find it you will have to somehow run a new vent line.
The basement ceiling is not insulated. I have looked above the rough-in area but I am not able to see anything. I even searched the whole basement ceiling and was not able to see anything capped off. I am comparing or looking for some similar to what google image search provided since I have never seen one myself.

Something that I have been thinking about is looking at the roof pipes and hopefully try to match them and see if I may be able to find the vent line (if it exists) that way.

My logical brain tells me if the builder put rough-ins, they should have put a vent line for the basement too, but that may be wishing too much.
 
  #6  
Old 01-22-20, 04:21 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,170
Received 2,272 Upvotes on 2,024 Posts
Yes, in my mind a rough in should have provision for a vent but... isss gray area. If they did install a vent it can fill with water and put strain on the pipes and be a possible source of a leak in the future so there is some reason not to do it. Mostly though I think it's going cheap or laziness as installing the vent piping later can be a major problem.

You can look in the attic to get an idea where the vent piping is located in your house but you'll still have to connect to them somehow. This could mean opening up a wall on the main floor to connect to the existing vent piping and drill the required hole through the bottom plate of the wall and into the basement.

Another option is to run the vent line out the side of the house. It can be vented out the side but it must be 24" above any window or it must be at least 10' laterally from any window.

Then as a last resort I would check with your inspectors to see if they would allow an AAV. In my town they are more lenient with remodel and repair work than they are with new construction. AAV do work when they work. They are a mechanical device and can fail so if you use one it can NOT be buried in a wall. It must be in an accessible location. If you put it inside a wall you need to install an access cover so you can get to it in the future if needed. If you go this route make sure to leave as much pipe exposed below the AAV as possible. In the future if you need to replace the AAV you can simply cut it off and glue on a new one... if there is free pipe below it.
 
  #7  
Old 01-23-20, 05:26 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for all the info Pilot Dane. I have a few things to think about and plan for.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: