Drylok Fast Plug - Sweating Spots

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Old 08-01-20, 06:42 PM
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Drylok Fast Plug - Sweating Spots

Hello!

We have a dry basement outside of 1 or 2 discrete cracks. No moisture on remaining wall/floor surfaces (poured bare concrete).

I chiseled-out the cracks and mixed the product to spec and got it troweled in. This is 1 application per crack - each being about 5 feet from floor. Letting them sit for 12 hours, we ran the garden house outside to test and they're both sweating like small armpit stains after a few minutes and are wet to the touch as they grow.

Is this a matter of the amount I used? Should the "V" be like an inch deep? It's jammed into each crack we expanded and is about 1-inch to either side and troweled neatly. Here's the detail as I see a lot of fingers pointing to improper application - which I can accept - but I didn't expect the fast plug to actually transmit moisture. It's as if it's absorbing water, not blocking it.

1. Cleaned surface.
2. Proper mix ratio
4. Back-chiseled crack - 1/4 inch continuous.
5. Poured wall, bare, about 30yr old.
6. 12hrs since initial set.

If it comes down to me not applying enough - can I just slap more over it or do I need to re-chisel/grind? I ask because this stuff has a bit of a hazmat situation with dusting.

Any thoughts would help - trying to avoid a full removal due to the hazards on the container.

Thanks,
Andy
 
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Old 08-01-20, 06:55 PM
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There are no pictures in your post.
Waterproofing needs to be done on the outside, not the inside.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 07:50 PM
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Agree with Joe. Regardless of what they say in their marketing, anything, DryLok or anything similar is like putting a bandaid on a gushing wound. It'll slow down the moisture, but won't solve anything. There is likely a matching crack on the exterior that needs to be sealed to keep the moisture out of the foundation.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 08:55 PM
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You would also need to look up the product instructions. Most products like that require the gap to be a certain width and depth and I am sure that 1/4" is not enough. And that a v notch that small is not correct. And slathering more over the top is probably not what the instructions say to do.

Also products like that are water resistant, not water proof. Big difference.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 11:13 PM
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Thank you all for responding. Sounds like interior products aren't the way to go - even if correctly installed - which likely I didn't achieve. I promise I looked for dimensions but I must have missed it. I'll snap pics for future questions.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 08-02-20, 05:17 AM
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Did a little research and drylok fastplug doesnt have hardly ANY details in the application instructions, which imo means it is prone to failure. In fact in one video it shows it being applied over hairline cracks on a birdbath with no v notching at all. Just mix it thinner they say. Hmm. Maybe their thought is that a birdbath has very little hydrostatic pressure? Tricky marketing.

Products that are more commercial in nature (not directed at homeowners) will have more chance of success due to being a better product that has the more stringent application instructions. An example would be Nox-Crete Hydroplug.

In any case, the others are correct that you really can't expect an interior repair to waterproof a wall if it is also cracked and needs repair on the outside.
 
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Old 08-03-20, 12:08 AM
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Very much appreciated, XSleeper! My wife and I did a lot more video searches on it and the variety of application styles varied so much - like you said - with no notching either - except one dude that had a large corner crack and he applied about 9lbs of it in the form of a pyramid. I was waiting for a stargate to open up.

Thank you very much for the extra research : )
 
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Old 08-03-20, 05:44 AM
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Drylock is a good product if used as intended. I use all the time for various applications including reducing and redirecting basement leaks. As sated by others, basement wall leaks cannot be corrected from the inside. But it can be redirected or reduced from the inside.

The first thing to do if walls leak (small to moderate leaking) is to provide proper landscaping and drainage away from foundation. That means that your grass or ground must slant away from foundation. That alone will resolve most drain problems. Planting a ground cover type plant will also help reduce water in the area.

If you don't want to spend the money on outside remedial solutions, you can use hydraulic cement to patch and eliminate leaking from a visual point of view. Keep in mind any hydrostatic pressure if stop in one point will seek an alternative path to relieve the pressure. So my approach is not to seal it but relieve it at the point of leakage.

Vee notch the wall if you're able to. Make it at least 1/2 inch deep. Insert a small vinyl tube (or string) as a wick or channel for the water to follow. Bring that all the way down to the floor. Right at the wall and floor chisel out a small divot or depression. Drill a hole all the way through the floor past the gravel. insert tube into hole. Cover the wall section with hydraulic cement (Drylock). You will no longer have a leaking basement wall. You are diverting the water to under the floor.
 
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Old 08-03-20, 03:59 PM
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Interesting, thank you, Norm201 - that rings a bell to ship straight beneath. Are there any general code requirements for 1/2-inch or deeper cuts into a poured foundation? I got nervous doing just 1/4". Not looking for guarantees but just asking in general. .
 
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Old 08-04-20, 03:53 AM
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Andrew,

This procedure has nothing to do with codes. However, I should warn you that if and when you sell your house this is something that should be noted to any possible buyer. It’s OK to hide this but not to conceal it.

Here are pictures of one of the “drains” I did. I did not finish it off because I had no need to do so. As a result it looks “bad”. But I assure you it work s fine. I have another spot that is finished but is behind appliances. That one is in fact dry.



This one pictured here looks moist because we just had a heavy rain and the soil is very dry and can’t soak up any moisture quick enough. However this drains away all water that might enter from the outside. This is one of the weak links in the foundation. As you can see I chiseled out a Vee section. The water follows this into the chiseled out “trough” and into a 5/8 hole I drilled into the foundation. If the leak is heavy, use a larger size drill.

Before I did this I had a venerable river flowing across my basement floor in any moderate to heavy rain. Now my wife has many boxes sitting on the floor no more than 3 to 5 feet away from this wall. We never had a problem. As you can see the floor is bone dry.


 
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