Help - Attic structural 2x4?

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Old 01-20-21, 08:12 AM
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Help - Attic structural 2x4?

We have a "Farm Ranch" style home which is basically a ranch with a converted attic. I'm in the process of renovating the bedroom on one side of the attic which has a wide shed dormer and while opening up the wall, i found an area i'd love to regain some floor space out of, but one 2x4 has me stumped. This is the view of the room facing the exterior wall (shed dormer in question on the left). The door goes out to a deck over the flat roof garage. Also attached an exterior of the home for reference




The area between the exterior wall, and the dormer bump out has four 2x4's framing out where a wall would be, and 3 out of the 4 of the 2x4s are absolutely not load bearing since they're barely cut properly, angled in some cases, and not really structurally holding on to anything. Just there to frame out the knee wall. But the corner 2x4 seems to be much more solid, and nailed into a 2x4 sole plate which is nailed over the wood slats i believe over a floor joist. Wisdom would tell me that since the sole plate isnt nailed directly to the floor joist, its either not load bearing, or if it is, its not the best job. PLUS instead of having the top of the 2x4 cut with an angled pitch and aligned to meet the roof rafter, only half of it meets the rafter, and cut perpendicular.

Thoughts? I'd love to just remove this frame out, and gain some floor space for nightstands since the bed will go under the dormer bump out.

Squared off bump out where angled roof becomes knee wall



Definitely not structural

Floor Plate for possible structural 2x4

Definitely not structural

Structural?
 
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Old 01-20-21, 08:21 AM
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Also if that IS structural to support the rafter, what's to stop me from removing the shoddy two piece 2x4 one and a half feet behind it, properly replacing that with a 2x4 cut properly and nailed to the rafter and the joist, and then removing this one. I find it hard to believe that 1 and a half feet forward provides significantly more structural support for a section of roof line close to the end, that's only 2feet wide maximum, no? If it was the center of the house, i'd argue the other way, that its certainly necessary
 
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Old 01-20-21, 09:13 AM
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As long as the 2x4 above it is not spliced there you are okay to remove it.
 
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Old 01-20-21, 09:38 AM
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Can you elaborate? Not sure i follow what you mean by spliced, or above it
 
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Old 01-20-21, 10:45 AM
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The corner 2x4. If the rafter that is above it is spliced, then that 2x4 is supporting the splice.

A splice is a joint. The rafter would not be continuous if it is spliced.
 
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Old 01-20-21, 11:30 AM
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Ah gotcha. Ok that makes more sense, and what i thought you meant. Yeah the 2x4 is basically just nailed into the 2x4 on the floor, and at the rafter with that 1 nail only half of it actually resting on the rafter. I'll most likely do the following


-Remove the 2x4s where the old bump out wall used to be
-remove the shoddy 2 piece 2x4 stud where the existing wall is
-replace with fresh 2x4 between floor joist and rafter
-add another 2x4 along new wall line at other rafter position before exterior wall.

This should open up the floor more and i'll be able to put a nightstand under the angled ceiling along the wall right next to the bed. Will do the same on the other side of the dormer
 
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Old 01-22-21, 12:33 PM
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Of the choices between tension, compression, bending and torsion, I’d say a 2x4 picked at random is in compression.

You could cut a paralleled 2x4 slightly shorter than your candidate 2x4, put a pry bar in the gap and SLOWLY remove your candidate.

The force required at the end of the bar to open the gap will tell you how much load your candidate is resisting.
If your 2’ pry bar lever is resisting 100 lbs you need to apply about 4 lbs to open the gap.

I cannot say definitely what force is "load bearing."
 
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Old 01-22-21, 12:58 PM
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I am not a Moderator, but...

There is no need to post a duplicate thread in separate forum sections and if not forbidden it is discouraged. Using the "New Posts" and "Today's Posts" buttons will show posts from all forum sections and expert Moderators will respond regardless of where the post is located. If they think it advisable they will move a thread to a more appropriate forum.

Just sayin'.
 
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Old 01-22-21, 05:58 PM
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Moderators note:

Correct. There is no need to start 2 threads on the same topic. Especially with the same exact photos, It wastes server space. If caught in time, duplicate threads will be deleted. Combining multiple threads just makes more work.

And your question was already answered. There is no point in asking the exact same question again.

Both threads have been combined and moved to the attic forum.
 
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