Finishing unfinished basement


  #1  
Old 01-23-02, 01:09 PM
ttinyqc
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Question Finishing unfinished basement

Hello,
As far as being handy around the house I make a good chemist so that is why we hired a contractor to finish our basement.
He has told us that there is no need to use a water proof paint on the block walls before studs and dry wall. He says just putting up a water proof plastic barrier is all that is needed. The walls are damp in some places and have white stains on them. We have a sump pump. The floor is dry. The house is 8.5 yrs old.
Do you folks agree about not painting the walls.
Any other tips would be very much appreciated. Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 01-23-02, 04:40 PM
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This is one of those pro and con types of subjects. In an effort to save the home owner some money I would probably recommend not painting the walls either. The plastic is not to stop water, but to stop dampness coming into your sheetrock and insulation. Concrete is always damp, it is the nature of the beast.
 
  #3  
Old 01-25-02, 09:48 AM
ttinyqc
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Thanks Jack. It makes sense. It just seemed from the point of view that I know what's behind the dry wall - a nice painted wall would be nicer, cleaner, dryer or something, but I would rather save money and put it toward the entertainment center Thanks!
 
  #4  
Old 01-26-02, 03:29 PM
TTThompson
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basement wall waterproofing

Doesn't sound like your basement walls have a big water problem. Although water is always a problem in a basement, and not providing a solution to eliminate or minimize it could cause you to lose your investment in your basement (rot, mildew, insects drawn to moisture, etc.).

Check the grading of the land on the outside. The flower beds, grass, dirt, etc. should slope away from the house. If needed a simple drain system can be installed a few feet below the surface to drain storm water away too.

I would definately recommend treating the wall. My basement walls were like yours for my ten year old house. I used UGL DryLok-latex. Two coats of this and the wall stays dry (even under hydrostatic pressure so says the label). It's simple enough anyone can paint it on, its consistency is like pancake batter. I recommend using an inexpensive 6" brush and don't bother cleaning it out. Just store the brush overnight in a gallon size freezer bag. At $75 (US) a bucket x3 it was a very inexpensive solution. I even put it on the cement floor before I put the flooring down. You can get it at any of the national home improvement centers.

Follow up the sealed wall with the vapor barrier and insulated stud wall and your done.
 
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Old 01-27-02, 10:17 PM
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i agree with TTThompson that if i had the choice, i would seal the walls first in addition to the vapor barrier. with basements, as many layers of preotection as possible may prevent problems in the future.

and be sure to attend to the grading of the house around the perimeter on a regular basis.
 
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Old 01-29-02, 05:19 PM
B
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what happens in 4-5 years when the sealer fails?

No sealer is going to last more than 4-5 years. What happens when it starts to fail. And it will. We've had posters on this forum attest to that.

The only true long-term waterproofing is done on the outside.
 
  #7  
Old 01-30-02, 04:40 PM
TTThompson
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sealer failure

If the builder did not seal the foudation wall that would be a problem. I believe it is a requirement here in Ohio. For a new build like this one, I would assume its done. Also, the house has a sump pump that will minimize moisture. All in all, I wouldn't think it woul be cost effective to excevate and re-seal, unless this is the dream house for the next thirty years. Check with the builder too. Most here in Columbus, OH provide a 30 year transferable structural warranty.
 
  #8  
Old 01-31-02, 02:48 PM
ttinyqc
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In reading all the responses I am learning a lot. The grading outside of the house seems fine. I really can't find an area where water seems to be going toward the house or building up around the foundation. The sump runs underground to a storm drain in the street. When te house was built before it was back filled the builder "painted" the foundation with black stuff, reminded me of driveway sealer. Most of the inside wall is dry. One corner is damp. More at the ceiling. More than actual dampness there is that white stuff on the blocks. Our contractor said the exact same thing that Jack and Bob said.He also added that this type of thinking was a recent change, but that over the years they found that painting the walls did not make a difference and was not cost effective. Anyhow I got to make up my mind if I am going to Dryloc the walls or not. He will be wanting to start soon.Thanks.
 
  #9  
Old 02-01-02, 05:02 AM
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Originally posted by ttinyqc
One corner is damp. More at the ceiling.
Your last post suggests that the moisture is not coming in thru the foundation but from above the foundation. If it truly is more damp at the ceiling, then I'd look for a leak in the walls, roof, floors above. If the area is more damp after a rain, then perhaps a window wasn't sealed properly. Maybe flashing on the roof isn't right.

If its always damp, then perhaps you have a drain that may be leaking or a pipe with a pin hole (nicked by a nail or screw?) Perhaps a washing machine that overflows?

The white powder is efflorescence, minerals in the foundation coming to the surface. This is harmless - looks worse than it really is. I'm not sure, but I beleive this will lead to failure of the sealer sooner than 4-5 years.
 
 

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