hanging horizontal blinds on arched window


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Old 01-29-07, 07:53 PM
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hanging horizontal blinds on arched window

Help. I have an arched window that is 69'' wide and 72" tall (not including the arch). I want to hang horizontal blinds starting at the bottom of the arch (I want to leave the arch open). I want an inside mount, unfortunately, there is no "top" window jamb to attach the blinds to. I do not want an outside mount and the blinds are too long for a side mount. I have heard some blind stores talk about installing a Palladium shelf and then hanging the blinds from the shelf. Has anyone heard of this? I want to do this myself. Can anyone tell me how to do this? Thanks.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 06:20 AM
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The palladium shelf is for installing a center support to. The brackets still need to be installed inside the window sides, if you want an inside mount. What do you mean "the blinds are too long for a side mount"?
 
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Old 01-30-07, 10:14 AM
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side mount reply

I wanted to purchase sheer shades (the ones that are like horizontal blinds but with fabric). I was told that I couldn't install those with a side mount because my window was too long (69"). I was told a side mount was for windows less than 48" wide. That is why they suggested a Palladium shelf, I guess for the needed support.?. My window is 5.75" deep so it could handle the hardware. What do you think?
 
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Old 01-30-07, 01:08 PM
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You can install them side mounted with the aide of the shelf, but you have to order it from a blinds place, as I don't think it's available retail. There's also a product called a "Floating Header" that's fitted to your window and practically invisible, but very pricey. You can also make your own "shelf" but it involves some building (a sort of partial cornice box) and painting it. If you're interested, I'll give you instructions.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 01:25 PM
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my own shelf

Yes, I am very interested! My husband is quite handy with his tools.
Thank you for your input, we are very appreciative.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 06:05 PM
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You're welcome and it's pretty simple, actually. Get 2 - 1x3's and cut them the width of your shade and they're going to be screwed together to make a long "L" bracket. One board will be on top and the other in the back, behind the shade. Predrill holes 3/8" down from the top of the back board and screw it to the back of the top board. Now you'll mount your end brackets in the window, then mount this board on top of the brackets with the back board coming down the back of the brackets. Now mount the center support bracket in the center of the board and install your blind. Oh, and you'll want to paint the boards first to match your trim so it'll blend in. Hope this is clear.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 09:33 PM
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Hold on a second.
While I like the idea above using the wood, and can picture it working fine for some things, the problem is with the shades she is interested in. She mentioned "sheer shades", which I take to mean something like Silhouette/Shangri-la/Vienna type shades. Right?

Well, each of these use a mounting bracket that has holes facing up or to the back, NOTHING to the sides. This means the brackets cannot be mounted *first* and the wood support then mounted onto them. When doing a side mount (aka; end mount) with these shades, you are forced to mount a metal L-bracket to each side of the window opening, pointing towards each other, and then nut & bolt the shade's mounting brackets to them facing properly towards you.

FYI: This type of mounting would also require a slightly additional deduction from your overall ordered width to allow for the thickness of the L-brackets at each end.
And YES, end mounting this type of product IS a pain, and DOES look makeshift, since the L-brackets/nuts & bolts are visible when finished.

Heres how I would do(have done) it. You mentioned the depth of the window is 5 3/4" so this will work great. Cut a 2 x 2 to exact width of the opening of your window. Paint/stain it to match your trim. At each end, mount a small L-bracket so that when placed into the window opening, the tab is facing down. Measure so the TOP of the 2 x 2 is at the height you want the shades(bottom of the arch). Position the 2 x 2 all the way back against the glass. Now screw through the L-bracket tab into the side of the window opening.

Order your new blinds as an inside mount and mount the brackets to the FRONT of the 2 x 2 with the top of the brackets even with the top of the wood. When finished, the wood piece will only be visible from outside. Be sure to use only 1" screws, so that they wont penetrate to the glass. Pre-drilling the holes will also prevent the wood from splitting too. At the width of 69", the sheer products mentioned are not as prone to sagging as a 2" wood/faux blind, and the sheer fabric is actually on a roller supported by the headrail's endcaps. The centermost bracket(s) are really there to keep the face of the headrail true and rigid, so that the roller stays square, level, and rolls up and down smoothly. The wood 2 x 2 will be easily able to handle that.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 07:15 AM
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Yes! I want to purchase Shangri-las. I was unaware that they do not have mounting on the sides.
So, Randy E, just to make sure I understand you right; with the 2x2 board attached to the back of my window (using L-brackets pointing down), I am going to attach my shades to the wood using the holes facing the back (kinda like it was an outside mount, even though it's an inside mount) Right?
A couple of questions... It sounds like you've done this before. How do you get a straight piece of wood. Is the 2x2 I buy from the lumber yard fine, or did you do something to it? Also, sounds like you don't think my 69" shades are too long (neither did the in-home consultant who suggested the blinds). I guess I was just a little worried about the length. My windows are such that I could do 2 blinds instead of one. My husband says that one (rather than 2) is better for stability. What do you think?
Thank you so much for taking the time to help me out. Your help has saved me lots of heartache and money!! We are very appreciative!!!

And thank you too, Shadeladie, for your helpful suggestions!!
 
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Old 02-01-07, 09:00 AM
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Sounds like Randy has the best method so I'll let him answer.
As for the 2 x 2's, yes they come like that and you'll need to buy one that's 6ft. and cut it down to the size you need. If you can, buy it from a lumber yard, but if you go to Home Depot or Lowes, you'll have to go thru several to make sure you don't get one that's warped, so check them out good. I usually buy pine cuz they're cheaper.
If it's one wide window, I'd just install one, simply because it'll look nicer, IMO.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 02:06 PM
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I would lean towards doing one also. You wont have any problems with the width of 69", since the extruded aluminum headrail (on the Shangri-la) is very rigid compared to others.

You are correct about using the holes facing towards the back of the brackets. (Just like doing an outside mount)

Make sure when installing the blind, you have the headrail fully seated into the brackets before pulling on the cord. They sometimes can be a little tricky making sure the top flat part of the headrail is lined up with the slot in the bracket. It may appear to be all the way in, but take a quick peek from below (before lowering)to be sure.

Remember to order as an INSIDE mount though, so that the necessary deductions (by the fabricator, not you) will be made. Dont worry about the mounting brackets, they are the same for I.M and O.M.

I just used pine from Home Depot, and made sure it was straight. And, I like to use small L-brackets that have 2 holes in each "leg". This will prevent the wood from rotating once there is weight hanging off the front of it.
 
 

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