Leaking oil tank

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  #1  
Old 03-14-04, 09:51 AM
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Leaking oil tank

Hello,
I have an above ground oil tank that is leaking. Has a steady drip at bottom of tank, not near the valve. Rust or pinhole I assume. It is a 275 gal. that is about 1/2 full. I have heard there is a belly patch that can be used. Has anyone else heard of this, or any other method for repairing a steadily leaking tank? I don't have a container to transfer 135 gal. to while I repair it, so I'm hoping for a method to repair it without draining it. If I have to replace the tank can I do it myself, or do I need to have an authorized company do the work and decomission the tank?

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 03-14-04, 09:59 AM
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absolutely

and they work great. It's basically a piece of foam-like rubber about the size of a quarter and its attached to a strong u-shaped magnet. It sticks on good and holds back the oil till the tank is empty...just let it run out completely and then have it replaced. If its an old tank its most likely tilted away from the outlet, unlike the new installs. So, when it get low place a 2X4 under each of the rear legs only, to get it all out.
 
  #3  
Old 03-16-04, 06:09 AM
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As hvac says the best option is the Magne-patch. There is also a belly patch kit but it is more work than it is worth. It has a piece of fiber material and a metal backer and straps that go around the tank. You goop up the gasket with some material they supply and strap it to the bottom of the tank. Don't use that. If you can't find a magne-patch, PM me and I'll send you one.

Ken
 
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Old 03-16-04, 06:40 AM
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I don't have a container to transfer 135 gal. to while I repair it
If you can't stop it. When I have lost steel diesel tanks on boats and had to get the fuel out. We use just the big plasic trash cans to put it in till we could get a new fiberglass tank in. Then put the fuel back in.On a oil tank we pitch it to the outlet all the time this will help keep the water and yuck out of the tank for you.ED

my .02 cents
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-08, 08:25 PM
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I too have a small leak on the bottom of a 275g tank and I need a MAGNE-PATCH to give me some time to buy a new tank and install... I have not found any internet vendors... Not even on ebay????

Can someone sell me one? Kfield, I sent you an PM...

Rmpl
 
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Old 10-12-08, 04:46 PM
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Magnetic Tank Patch

I found one for you here:
http://patriot-supply.com/search.cfm...no&startRow=81

It is Westwood Products' # S216 & Patriot's # WWS216. The cost is listed @ $13.60.
Westwood calls it "Magic-Patch".
 
  #7  
Old 10-13-08, 02:15 PM
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keep in mind...

the magnetic patch is only a temporary . Place the magnepatch on the leak till the tank is emptied. Trying to refill the tank till you can afford one, is rather insane . Its not about affordability... If the tank lets go which is not out of the question, it may be cheaper to throw the keys in the mailbox and foreclose even if you own the place. The EPA will have you remove the foundation and dig till no fuel is present in the soil and then it is treated as hazardopus waste. I saw 5 gallons spilled in the 80's, and the required dirt removal was large enough to put a house in the hole. More than 100 dump truck loads. Don't take the chance... The patch is on a weak point that has penetrated the skin of the tank and the surrounding metal is likely to be very thin. Replace it while there is still hope. If it starts to leak in a seam your screwed.
 
  #8  
Old 10-13-08, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by hvac01453 View Post
I saw 5 gallons spilled in the 80's, and the required dirt removal was large enough to put a house in the hole. More than 100 dump truck loads.
I find this hard to believe... but then again, you are in MA.

Rmpl
 
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Old 10-13-08, 03:48 PM
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I might tend to think that's a typo ... at least I hope so. I can't imagine 5 gallons doing that much.

In the following photos, the oil that leaked was shown by forensic testing to have been leaking at least 15 years, and perhaps longer... it's not an exact science... This spill was from a leaking underground 550 ... the spread of the oil was facilitated by having hit ground water that fluctuated seasonally from between 15' and 8' ... so, all the soil between those levels was heavily contaminated. Thankfully for the homeowners, the ground water flows AWAY from the home. They only had to excavate around 6' under the building in one 15' wide area.

I should mention that the pictures at the link are not the ultimate size, nor depth of the hole. It got quite a bit bigger and deeper before all was said and done. And this is only what happened on the homeowners property, the contamination spread under the road, and is yet to be excavated ...

This hole required around 35 tandem loads to fill.

http://s224.photobucket.com/albums/d...tion/?start=20

Being in MA has NOTHING to do with it... ALL states are involved, and if they aren't, you wanna deal with the FEDS ? VA isn't exempt... you folks might do things different down there, but when it comes to environmental issues, yer the same as us Yankees!

PLEASE... save yourself some heavy duty grief. Have the tank replaced AS SOON AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE, even if you have to take out a loan to do so... JUST DO IT! Don't put yourself at risk of having to deal with the DEP at ANY level, even if it's only ten gallons... it's grief you don't need. If your tank DOES 'bust a gut', yer screwed. period.
 
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Old 10-13-08, 04:35 PM
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5 Gallons?

Nope, sorry, I don't buy it either.

Hey Troop, why do those pics look so familiar?
 
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Old 10-13-08, 04:48 PM
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Hey Troop, why do those pics look so familiar?
Hmmm... I dunno ?! maybe you know the 'homeowner' ?
 
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Old 10-13-08, 08:52 PM
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how do I know? I was there...

Where was it? South Post Fort Devens... We had a training site that required us driving at night without lights and refueling in the dark. I'm sure you've seen how much fuel gets pumped from a refueling truck, well we had plastic down but some guys are not too neat and the coupling separated from one of the hoses. The plastic caught quite a bit of it but the EPA from Post got involved and my bucket loaders and 5 ton dumps worked for about 3 days disposing of that stuff and they said we had to keep digging til no fuel oil odor was present...It was nearly impossible...I couldn't believe how far down that stuff could travel... but think of this... a safety measure in rough seas to knock down the waves while at sea is to dump a quart of oil over the side...It can actually partially flaten the sea around a boat in distress... I've never tried it, but it's in the Chapmans Boaters Manual..
 
  #13  
Old 10-13-08, 09:01 PM
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another incident happened last winter or the one before.

A fuel delivery company delivered fuel to the wrong address and the house had recently been converted from #2 to gas. They didn't remove the fill pipes. The guy stopped pumping I think @150 Gallons. Needless to say, the basement was full of #2. They reverse pumped out as much as they could I imagine but I saw on the news he had to jackhammer out the concrete slab and part of the walls and dig /remove the contaminated dirt under it. The oil company I don't think had that much insurance and I think he had to try have his home owners ins cover it . There was a big dispute over who was at fault and who was gonna pay... What a mess That was in the Boston burbs I think.
 
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Old 10-14-08, 03:25 PM
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OK, so a coupling came loose and spilt oil ...

But FIVE GALLONS ?

100 truck loads ?

Still ain't buying it.

Especially if the cleanup was done immediately. There is NO WAY that 5 gallons could spread that far in that short a time.

Five HUNDRED gallons, maybe ... but FIVE ? never.
 
  #15  
Old 10-14-08, 04:53 PM
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WOW...here in Canada "Nova Scotia"...your tank can't be over 10 years old...or you won't get house insurance...too many environmental clean ups happened around here...so they tried to put a stop to it....and yes...here you need a qualified person to install your tank..it's not worth the hassle with the insurance people if you do it yourself.
 
  #16  
Old 10-14-08, 04:59 PM
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10 Years Old?

What a racket. Any tank, even with little or no maintenance will last at least 20 years. Does this 10 year limit also include indoor tanks? How about the plastic & double walled tanks?
 
  #17  
Old 10-14-08, 05:44 PM
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yep...a racket I agree...the tank I replaced on the old home was a heavery gauge steel than the one I put in...but it was 10 years old on the metal tag on the tank...they say there is another 5 years extention for that 12 gauge tank now...the newer styles of tanks (Fiber)..I hear...and this is only hear say..20 years....if you want your house insured...it's sad..I know...and the tank here is due in another 2 years

http://gov.ns.ca/nse/petroleum/docs/OilTankInstall.pdf

Here is the next island to us (PEI)..this is the requirments there..somehow the seemed to have shaved five years here and there in Nova Scotia...
Home heat tanks must be replaced every 15-25 years depending on the tank design and steel thickness as follows:
http://www.atlanticrbca.com/eng/regulations_pei.html
14 gauge (2 mm) with end outlet - 15 years
12 gauge (2.3 mm) with end outlet - 20 years
14 gauge (2 mm) with bottom outlet - 20 years
14 gauge (2.3 mm) with bottom outlet - 25 years

they say inspection 10 years here...but they make us chage them??
http://www.carters.ca/pub/bulletin/c...ylb88.htmevery
 
  #18  
Old 10-15-08, 09:16 AM
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inground tanks

Went to an ASHRAE class in about 93 in NH and it was on inground oil tanks and they were requiring double wall and the tag with serial number and date of MFG was only 20 years and they said it was required by law to remove it... I haven't personally read the laws or code, only what they told us
 
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