Tankless coil boiler options


  #1  
Old 10-19-04, 06:23 PM
JJoan
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Tankless coil boiler options

Our house was built in 1897 and has had 2 heating systems, coal boiler and then a Peerless tankless coil, steam boiler, Model # JOT-3-PF-SU. I believe it was put in some time in the late 40's or early 50's. There is just my husband and myself here. It's been running great for the past 13 years for us, but now I have noticed that there seems to be more boiler water then we manual put in, the site glass is always full. Tonight we drained all the water out, flushed it with fresh water so to speak till it ran almost clear. Filled it to the normal site glass line,and now we are waiting to see if it fills more. Washing my hands after doing the above I noticed the hot water from the kitchen faucet has a lower pressure, where is didn't till we drained it. We've been thinking it may be a leak in the tankless coil but now we are almost positive. If that's the case, what would be the best option, get a new tankless coil and replace the old one, or get a whole new system, and the question on that is, is a separate hot water storage tank needed. I'm thinking no, seeing how it's just Larry and I, we have never run out of hot water but we do run it on the slow side filling up the tub so it does not run through the boiler to fast. Any ideas are welcome. We live in MA so our winters are cold!
Joan
 
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Old 10-19-04, 07:05 PM
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I would suggest an indirect water heater. Mega Stor makes a nice 26 gallon one that would eliminate your coil and give you a reserve. I'm not sure your coil is even defective from what you described. You will just have to use the proper tappings on the boiler when you tie in the indirect. Draining and flushing a steam boiler isn't something you want to do very often. The oxygen in the new water causes corrosion. Once every few years is no problem, but don't do it more often if you don't have another reason.

Ken
 
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Old 10-19-04, 07:47 PM
JJoan
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"I would suggest an indirect water heater."
That is a good idea, I didn't know if the whole coil was need to use an indirect unit and with this on maybe leaking...I didn't think we could go that route .
"I'm not sure your coil is even defective from what you described."
No, well shoot, what could it be then?

We knew about the oxygen corrosion, and that's the first time we drained it, but we didn't have a choice we had to see if water was getting in.

Thank's Ken so much for your fast and helpful reply!!
 
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Old 10-20-04, 04:56 AM
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You may just have slow returns. Once the condensate returen piping starts to get clogged, it may take hours for all the water to return to the boiler. If you check and refill the boiler when a lot of water is still out, it will eventually return and make the water level rise. Usually a leak n the domestic coil is small. Or I should say they usually start small. If you add the indirect or discontinue using the coil, all you need to do is plug the tappings in the coil and even if it leaks, you are good to go.
Ken
 
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Old 10-20-04, 06:06 AM
JJoan
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Hummm, if that's the case then the only thing I can say is the overfilling happened during the summer months when we were not using the boiler for heat, just for the domestic water. Unless it all happened over last winter and we didn't notice it, but the thing is I never drain and clean the low water cutoff and refill while the unit is running, the pressure is up so the water level in the glass is at that time not reliable, I try and do it while the unit has cooled down some and also, even though we still have to drain some to clear out that low water cutoff in the summer it was up then too, that's when I noticed it. At that time I did drain some out but shoot, maybe it just was not enough.

I checked the glass this morning and it seems to be staying at a normal level. I'll check everyday and see what it does. I just wish I knew why the domestic pressure is lower now. We did shut that valve off after we drained the boiler, waited a bit then opened it to see if we could hear water running but we didn't, (and no we did not turn on any faucets to introduce air in the line) so at that point we just refilled the boiler. Maybe by shutting it off we dislodged some rust and that's plugging it.
 
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Old 10-20-04, 11:23 AM
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All your assumptions sound reasonable to me. There is no reason why draining the boiler water would have affected the domestic coil flow at all. Maybe the valve you closed is bad and the washer (if it is an old style) came loose and is blocking flow. You can check that easily enough.

Ken
 
  #7  
Old 10-20-04, 12:39 PM
JJoan
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That's our next step, checking/cleaning or replacing that this weekend. Even though it's newer then the rest of the ones down there it did leak at one time then that leak corroded itself closed. Ken, thank you for all of your great help, I appreciate it very much!!!
 
 

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