New basement radiators


  #1  
Old 11-23-04, 09:34 PM
toobusy
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New basement radiators

Hi. My first time here. I used to be an HVAC engineer, so I somewhat understand this, but don't profess to have much of a clue on what is going on.

I'm almost finished remodeling basement. In summer, all my hot water pipes in basement were replaced (copper) and tucked up into floor joists. 2 story house w/ cast iron radiators. I had the option to zone, but chose not too, mainly because I thought not worthwile to have zones east & west, each having part of 1st and 2nd floors. Anyway, not the point.
System has two main loops off boiler, and runs in parallell. On each loop, I had a basement cast iron added (purchased used). Both were tested and seemed to be working fine. Now that it is cold, system is running. One of the basement radiators is getting good and warm (not totally, however, even with all air bled out). The East radiator is ice cold. Tried bleeding and draining through spigot on return end of radiator. Contractor came today - not sure what he did yet, but still ice cold. Supply to radiator is about 6 1/2 ft below run in floor joists. there is no bleeder valve at top of verticle run to radiator. Should there have been? Any suggestions on how to get the water to flow to this radiator. Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 11-24-04, 05:34 AM
A
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Welcome to the DIY Forum

If you have the supply piping running overhead, and then dropping down to the basement cast iron radiators, you probably have an air lock in the piping, at the highest point. I would try installing bleeder valves at the highest point in the overhead supply piping.
 
  #3  
Old 11-24-04, 03:45 PM
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Wink

Like wise You have to have a bleeder at the top there. Any where you could trap air put a bleeder.

ED
 
  #4  
Old 11-26-04, 07:37 AM
Ken Greene
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i agree with the others on the need ofr bleeders but also water flowwlow the path of least resistance. if i understand your decription your basement splits (used a tee to feed two different arteas of the basement). if this is hte case you need balacning valves on your system also so that the warmer section can be throtlled down to make the resistence the same for both sides of the system therefor making the water flow to both radiators equally.
 
  #5  
Old 11-29-04, 09:31 AM
toobusy
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My contractor is coming today to install valves on the lines. It does not appear to be air, since there is hardly any room for it. The two basement radiators are on separate runs from the boiler. One is working, one is not. The cold one is at the end of a run - thus, no flow. The other one is on a run that seems to be getting way too much flow (all rooms are hot). Hopefully, this works.
 
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Old 11-29-04, 03:37 PM
A
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Please post back and let us know if the balancing valves work. Others could benefit from this info.

Thanks,
 
  #7  
Old 11-30-04, 07:41 PM
toobusy
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Contractor installed the valves. There are actually 3 runs off the boiler. First has only 2 rads on it; second has 5 (2 small); third has 6, including the problem basement one at the end of the run. We've chocked back the first run back probably about 70% (my son is much more comfortable). The second line is probably closed down about 30-40%, and we left the last run wide open. Finally getting some flow through the basement radiator, but still seems slow to get hot. (the other new basement rad, on run no. 2, gets hot fast). Contractor says next step could be to add a bigger pump. Should we go to this exteme?

BTW, I have to hand it to my heating contractor. I acted as Gen'l on the remodel of my basement, but he designed the new piping layout (all heating pipes were replaced). he is taking full responsibility (and costs) for getting this rad to work and system to be properly balanced.
 
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Old 11-30-04, 09:17 PM
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Did you ever install bleeders on the overhead piping, so you could bleed air?

What is the boiler pressure? If you have enough boiler pressure, a bigger circulating pump is probably not going to buy you any performance improvement.

If you do not have sufficient boiler pressure, and you have air in the lines, a larger pump is not going to help.
 
  #9  
Old 12-15-04, 05:26 PM
toobusy
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Thought I would send an update. Playing with the valvle (before new pump addition) ending up making all radiators hot, but it was still a crap shoot on whether the problem basement one would get hot (seemed to work at night, not in the a.m.). Also problematic because this line included radiator in room with thermostate, which tended to make the system run longer than it needed for rest of house.

So contractor installed additional circulator on the run having the problem radiator (instead of replacing existing circulator). Probably overkill, but heat works. It is louder than before, and I can hear the distinct sound of air rushing through the line (as if the add'l pump is forcing traped air through the system).
As long as my new basement rooms are warm!
 
 

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