Remove air from water heated system


  #1  
Old 02-02-05, 04:56 AM
edin991
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Remove air from water heated system

I have a water heated house. However, I am having trouble removing air from the system. While the circulation pump is off I close the valve to the pump and try to let new cold water into the system while opening the provided drain valve. While I think that I have removed the air, every time the furnace kicks on, I can hear the bubles in the pipes. What am I doing wrong so that the excessive air stays in the pipes.
 
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Old 02-02-05, 05:22 AM
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edin991, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
Is this baseboard radiation? Are the baseboards higher than the drain valve? Most systems have a bleed valve at the high point in the system. Thats where the air goes to. Good luck.
 
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Old 02-02-05, 08:01 AM
edin991
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Thank you for your reply.

Yes, I have baseboard radiators, and they are located in the rooms on the second floor. The provided drain valve is actually in the basement, on the piping close to the furnace. So I thought, if I introduce new water at a higher pressure, I would recirculate the entire water through the system, and when I open the drain valve, it will remove old water along with the air in it. But this is not what is happening. Am I missing on something else? Do the baseboard radiators usually come with a bleed valve so that I can remove air at the radiators maybe?
The pressure in the system is 12 - 15 psi. Should I increase the pressure maybe. I am not sure if this is recommended, and the maximum pressure is rated at 50 psi.
 
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Old 02-02-05, 08:20 AM
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Most systems I have seen have bleeders at each baseboard or radiator. This is because the pipe usually comes out of the floor there and makes a high loop and thats where the air traps. Not sure about increasing the pressure. There are experts here that may be able to answer that question. Watch this post for their answers.
 
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Old 02-02-05, 08:23 AM
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I was having the same problem. I went to the high point in the house and kept letting the air out. I must have done this for a month, every single day. When the system started up I could hear all the air. I finally did the same thing as you. I hooked a hose up to the drain value and opened up the fresh water supply and let it run for a good five to ten minutes. At first I hear some air come out of the hose, but then it was just water. After about five minutes I heard some more air come out, so be patient. If you do this, just make sure you watch the pressure on the system. I closed the system back up and ran the heater. Right away I could tell a difference. I still heard air, but 80% of it was gone. I let the system cool off and hooked the hose back up. I let it run again for about five or ten minutes. After I closed the system off, I started the system back up, I couldn’t hear anything. That was a couple of weeks again and my system is silent, which is very nice because it has been a long time. I am so use to hearing the air in it. I would try this method. I only have a one-story house, so you might have to run through the steps more than once since your is two stories.
 
 

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