Loud Noise, Help!

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-05-05, 12:13 AM
bedstuyhmowner
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Exclamation Loud Noise, Help!

My boiler is making a very loud mechanical whirring sound when the burner is on. It's a gas hot water system. I've been having other issues with the circulator all winter, trying to nurse it along for the season. The past problem was that the relay wasn't working properly--for a while it wouldn't kick on at all and I'd have to "force" it on by pushing the contacts together. Then, more recently, it started coming on all the time, as soon as the boiler came on, which as I undersatnd it is too soon, which meant that the water didn't get as hot. Now this noise. Is it safe to leave the boiler on? The noise is loud! At first I thought maybe some kind of constuction equipment was idling outside my house! UPDATE--it's definitely coming from the circulating pump, which is still working, just really loud. I just need to know if it's safe to keep the boiler on until someone can look at it.
 

Last edited by bedstuyhmowner; 03-05-05 at 01:17 AM. Reason: update
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-05-05, 08:12 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,928
Noise

If the circulator is a B&G with the springs, you likely have a broken spring. Very simple repair if you have the part. I would suggest running it as little as possible to prevent damage to the bearing assembly.
 
  #3  
Old 03-05-05, 01:49 PM
Andrew's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 950
I agree with Grady, but if you have a pump with the spring-type coupler, don't even fool with it. Yank the entire pump and get a maintenance free Taco 007 pump for little $. Physically smaller, and very reliable.
 
  #4  
Old 03-05-05, 10:02 PM
bedstuyhmowner
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the tips. My maintenance company came and changed the spring. It's much quieter now but still louder than it was before. The guy who did the repair said the motor is responsible for the noise. I've been planning to get a new boiler, trying to nurse this one through the winter. He said replacing the pump would be expensive, like $500, and not covered by my contract. I have to find the contract to see what it says. I'm thinking that if I should probably move forward with replacing the boiler sooner rather than later since as I understand it changing the pump will involve draining the system. The boiler is at least 40 years old and has no safety features, no automatic fill, and seems to be in decline. I'd like to have a more dependable system so that I can rest easier and not be down in the basement all the time looking at it and wondering what the deal is. Right now if the thermostat is set where it normally is (70) the boiler is coming on very frequently, like every 20 minutes, and just burning for a few minutes, 3-8 minutes, and then shutting down. That doesn't seem right. Probably the pumpis getting hot and shutting itself down?
 
  #5  
Old 03-06-05, 08:15 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,928
The most common cause for the spring failure is sagging motor mounts. The mounts can be replaced in 15-30 minutes. No need to replace the whole circulator or even the whole motor just for motor mounts. The price you were quoted sounds way high unless there are circumstances beyond the norm.
An easy way to see if the pump is getting hot is simply to feel the motor.
If you are considering replacement of the boiler, I would not put any money in the existing one unless absolutely needed. When looking for a new boiler, Buderus is top shelf equipment if you are going to be in the home long term. If you are only going to live there for +/- 10 years, I wouldn't spend the extra for a Buderus, any boiler will last that long & then some.
 
  #6  
Old 03-07-05, 02:01 PM
bedstuyhmowner
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I think the price is high primarily because the mechanic doesn't want to do the job. He says the system would have to be drained and the time involved becomes expensive. Drain the system, change the pump, refill the system, bleed 17 radiators... He and one other company have recommended Burnham boilers. They seem to be very popular here (Brooklyn, NY). I'm getting an estimate from another company tomorrow. The problem may very well be the motor mounts but I'm also concerned about the relay acting up so much. The mechanic also said that the motor might be loud because it needs oil and it's a closed housing-nowhere to put oil. It's an armstrong pump. I have to say that I don't really trust him very much, I've only had him come in because I have a maintenance contract and that's who they send. It's obviously in their interest to do as little work as possible on my boiler. This particular company seems to be in the business of selling maintenance contracts (and fuel) and not actually doing much maintenance.
 
  #7  
Old 03-19-06, 02:40 PM
sdanville's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Western Michigan
Posts: 93
motor mount location...

i went thru 3 couplers on my B&G in the last year.
I read here its the motor mounts that often shorten the coupler life .
Ive run the motor detached, seems perfect and only 2 years old,,
the bearing assembly I have replaced in the last 3 years.. they both seem fine...
the bolts all liine up...etc

my question is where are these motor mounts ?> and how to I check them ?
thanks

PS i ordered a new taco but still want to know.
 
  #8  
Old 03-19-06, 04:41 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,928
Motor mounts

The motor mounts are the metal/rubber rings around which the motor cradle clamps. There is one on each end of the motor. If you remove the cradle, you will probably notice the bottom part of the ring is smaller than the top part. Usually the shaft end is worse than the other end. Motor mounts are inexpensive & easy to replace with the right tools (cape chisel & a hammer). Mounts are a group cheaper & easier than a whole circulator unless you have valves on both sides of the circ.
 
  #9  
Old 03-21-06, 02:31 PM
digraph's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: South Shore, Boston, MA
Posts: 65
I just got a frantic call from my wife saying that the whole house was making the loudest noise and shaking. I told her to turn off the heat and everything was ok. I'm going home shortly and I'll check what kind of circulator we have. Probably stay home from work tomorrow morning and head out to the pluming supply.

I think I'll have the same problem - I don't know how old the pump is, but every so often I had to oil it.


Originally Posted by bedstuyhmowner
My boiler is making a very loud mechanical whirring sound when the burner is on. It's a gas hot water system. I've been having other issues with the circulator all winter, trying to nurse it along for the season. The past problem was that the relay wasn't working properly--for a while it wouldn't kick on at all and I'd have to "force" it on by pushing the contacts together. Then, more recently, it started coming on all the time, as soon as the boiler came on, which as I undersatnd it is too soon, which meant that the water didn't get as hot. Now this noise. Is it safe to leave the boiler on? The noise is loud! At first I thought maybe some kind of constuction equipment was idling outside my house! UPDATE--it's definitely coming from the circulating pump, which is still working, just really loud. I just need to know if it's safe to keep the boiler on until someone can look at it.
 
  #10  
Old 03-21-06, 02:38 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 13,928
digraph

There is a 99% probability you have a B&G 100 series circulator & the coupling is broken. While at the supply house getting a new coupling, preferably a spiral spring type, get new motor mounts. It should take less than an hour to change the coupling & the mounts. It's a whole lot easier than replacing the entrire circulator.
 
  #11  
Old 03-22-06, 11:04 AM
digraph's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: South Shore, Boston, MA
Posts: 65
Thanks for your help. This morning has been crazy.
I drained the heating system, and then read your post At least all the water drained and looked clear, that's something. I think the set screw connecting to the circulator shaft broke off, but I only realized it after I had the motor off.

And I can turn the circulator shaft with out feeling any obstructions so my guess is that as you say, the coupler is faulty.

I drove around the corner to plumbing supply and they guy wouldn't even talk to me b/c I'm not a contractor and I don't have a license. Went home and found another shop a few miles away that said they have the parts in stock.

When I got there they said even tho the parts were in the computer, the stock boy obviously put them in the wrong place. After 30 minutes, the old timer came out and found the correct coupler in the back, but they didn't have the motor mounts.

I removed the motor mounts originally, and they looked OK, but at this point I wasn't going to put the old ones back on. Plus I know that sometimes looks are deceiving. The plumbing supply sent me to the electric motor supply around the corner, and they had the right Bell and Gossett in stock, I think the guy over charged me tho.

Anyway, I'll put everything back together tonight and hope for the best.
Thanks for the help so far
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes