Removing Hot Water Baseboard


  #1  
Old 05-02-05, 03:03 AM
ktg
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Removing Hot Water Baseboard

I have a forced hot water heating system that uses 1" steel pipes and baseboard radiators that runs along the exterior walls of the entire house.

Recently I purchased an exterior French door to be installed in my dining room. The dining room is 12' long and the door rough-in is only 5', however I have this heating pipe that comes in from the kitchen and runs down the length of the room.

What I would like do is to cut the pipe as it enters the dining room, send it down into the basement, run it along the basement ceiling and send it back up to the dining room and reconnect it on the other side of where the door will be installed.

Does this sound like a reasonable plan?

Is this a DIY project? I am reasonable comfortable cutting and threading pipe.

How do I make sure that hot water doesn't come gushing out at me when I cut the pipe? The heating system can be completely shut off as the weather is warm enough that I don't need the heat to be on.

Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Kai
 
  #2  
Old 05-02-05, 11:03 AM
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H/W bsbd

Sounds like a plan to me. If you are comfortable cutting & threading pipe, go for it. To prevent a mess & getting burned you need to shut off the power, fuel, & water to the boiler. Then drain the heating system, cut the pipes & procede with your plan.
 
  #3  
Old 05-05-05, 08:37 AM
New Jersey Tom
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Similar situation

Grady,
I have a similar situation as KTG. I am going to put french doors in my dining room, but my baseboard runs across the length of the outside wall. Is it acceptable to cut the pipe and feed it into a radiator to keep heat in the room and then run in into the basement and connect up to the other side ? I am assuming if I just cut pipe and go to the basement and up to the other side without some heat source in the dining room, I will burn a lot more fuel to keep downstairs warm. Thanks,

Tom
 
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Old 05-05-05, 04:34 PM
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Tom

I'm not clear on your question. Does the baseboard current go thru the area into which you want to put the french doors? Do both the dining room & the adjacent room have baseboard? If you can post a crude drawing of the area in question it might help me understand.
 
  #5  
Old 05-05-05, 04:42 PM
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Id say to both of you for the small cost put bleeders on top of each L there as they go down in the floor and also as they come up out of the floorand tie back onthe pipe.

ED
 
  #6  
Old 05-06-05, 06:36 AM
New Jersey Tom
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Sorry, yes the baseboard runs along the south wall ( 8' across) where I want to put the french door and the door will be 6' across. The baseboard then runs into the next room. The thermostat also happens to be in the dining room. What I would like to do is totally remove entire length of basboard, connect the front pipe to a small radiator on east wall ( 3' before a doorway), drop pipe from radiator to the basement then come back up to other side and connect up again.

-----------------------------------------
! ............... ....baseboard 8' ............ !
! 3' .......................................... 3' . !
! .......................................... ..... . !
doorway ................................. doorway
! ........................................... ..... !
! .................................... ............ !

I hope this explaination is clearer. It makes sense in my head, but then again most things do ! HAHA

Thanks for any advice you can give me.

Tom
 

Last edited by New Jersey Tom; 05-06-05 at 06:48 AM.
  #7  
Old 05-07-05, 09:01 AM
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NJ Tom

Sounds like it should work. When you say "radiators" do you mean cast iron or baseboard? Mixing cast iron radiators & baseboard on the same loop can often lead to heating problems. As Ed suggested, installation of bleeder tees can save big headaches when trying to remove air.
 
 

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