can a diy-er do an acid flush?


  #1  
Old 09-23-05, 07:25 AM
aimeemc1124
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can a diy-er do an acid flush?

We recently bought my mother in-laws 1956 home. The boiler is original to the house and has worked fine for the last three years we have been here. Just at the begining of the summer the hot water started to get weaker and weaker out of the tap. Now it bearly trickles out. If you let it run, it will heat up, and sometimes run full force but then die back down after a minute or two. We have had several professionals come out to look at it and they each say something different. But all agree on trying an acid flush. What is this and how do you do it? I don't know what kind of boiler we have other than is says "Columbia Boiler Co. of Pottstown, PA" on the Cast iron front.
 

Last edited by aimeemc1124; 09-23-05 at 03:59 PM.
  #2  
Old 09-23-05, 05:09 PM
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Acid Flush

It is not something I would recommend as a do it yourself project. It can be very dangerous. An acid flush is the process by which an acid (often muriatic or oxalic) is forced thru the hot water coil in the boiler.
 
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Old 09-24-05, 07:23 AM
aimeemc1124
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Does the trickling hot water problem sound like it would be solved by this. The cold water has no pressure problems at all. The hot water is only effected.
 
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Old 09-24-05, 06:09 PM
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Low H/W flow

It certainly sounds like the coil is clogged. An acid flush is a gamble in that on rare occasion, the coil will completely clog where it cannot be cleaned at all or even more rarely, the acid will eat a hole in the coil. In both cases the coil would have to be replaced. In twenty years in the business, I've only encountered a coil clogging twice. Once I had a coil fail during or shortly after the cleaning.
 
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Old 09-26-05, 07:29 AM
aimeemc1124
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How involved is replacing the coil? And where could I find parts for the job?
 
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Old 09-26-05, 08:02 AM
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Wink

Id for sure try an acid flush first. Take both the in and out water lines off to the coil if you have to. A cheap little drill pump. A bucket and some hose. pump the acid mix from the bucket in the in line and let it run back into the bucket.

ED
 
 

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