Getting boiler back on-line

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  #1  
Old 09-26-05, 06:23 AM
jcyr
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Getting boiler back on-line

Recently, I removed one of the baseboards in my kitchen and had to reconnect hot-water lines to re-complete the system. I purged the system completely when doing this. Unfortunately, I am a rookie at this sort of thing and did not realize that I could have only purged that particular zone. In each zone (2 total) I have at least 1 air valve built into an elbow joint and have been using them to remove air from the lines. Is there a better way to do this? Also, my boiler PSI is at 0 so when I turn on the thermostat to have it call for heat, the boiler heats up very quickly then shuts itself down in about a minute due to reaching the temp set point.

I have an expansion tank and the air pressure in the tank is 0 also. Do I just add air back into the tank to bring the boiler pressure back up , or is there another way to bring the boiler pressure up as well?

Once the air pressure is up, what is the best way to ensure that I have removed all the air from the system (I have a Telydyne Laars JVC 75 gas boiler)?

Help!!!

Thanks
jcyr
 

Last edited by jcyr; 09-26-05 at 07:47 AM. Reason: update...
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  #2  
Old 09-27-05, 05:56 AM
jcyr
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Question boiler pressure at 0..help!

All,

I have a problem with my hot water heating system...I drained the entire system to remove one of my baseboards in my kitchen. I have been trying to re-fill the system, but am not sure that I am doing correctly. I only have about 5psi in my expansion tank, and have read in my ops manual and on this site that it should be 12. Can I just add air directly into the expansion tank to bring it up to 12psi? My boiler pressure is reading 0. How do I increase the boiler pressure? I cannot find anything in the lines that resembles anything that would increase pressure in the boiler nor can I find anything in the operation manual. I have a Teledyne Laars JVT 75 Gas fired boiler.

thanks

J cyr
 
  #3  
Old 09-27-05, 04:01 PM
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Boiler Pressure

There should be a tire type valve on the tank thru which you can add air. I suggest using a hand pump. Somewhere in the piping going to the boiler should be some sort of valve used to add water. Usually there is a pressure reducing valve having a top kind of bell shaped. Sometimes on each side of the reducing valve there is a hand valve. There certainly should be a hand valve on at least one side.
 
  #4  
Old 09-28-05, 06:15 AM
jcyr
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I was successful at bringing my expansion tank pressure back up to 12psi with a hand pump as you had suggested. Thanks.

There is a valve with a lever on the city line just prior to where the city line junctions between the expansion tank and my air scoop. I don't see any other valves in the area, especially that are bell shaped.

Will just having the water flowing into my system bring up the boiler pressure even with all that air in the system? Would it be easier to backflow the system with a garden hose and water in order to help purge out the air in my system while adding water at the same time? I have several air vents throughout the system that I could open up to purge the air....
 
  #5  
Old 09-28-05, 06:31 PM
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Valves

Just per chance, does the city water hook up to the bottom of the expansion tank like this? http://www.amtrol.com/filltrol.htm
 
  #6  
Old 09-29-05, 05:37 AM
jcyr
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city water

That is the exact set up I have. There is a section of tubing that leads from my city line to that set up. There is a shut off valve in that line about 1.5 ft from the tank.

Should the air bleed screw on the top of the air scoop be open when I try to bleed the system?

Any thoughts on filling the boiler through the drain? I have not done anything to the system since Tuesday when I filled the tank to 12psi. I checked it this morning and it still reads the same so I am not losing pressure in the tank. I just don't seem to be able to get water into the system to push the air out.

Jason
 
  #7  
Old 09-29-05, 05:50 PM
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Fill-trol

What you have is called a Fill-trol system. When the valve in the city line going to the tank is open, the Fill-trol should feed water into the system. If it does not, the Fill-trol is not working. If this is the case, I suggest replacing the Fill-trol with a reducing valve such as the Bell & Gossett FB-38.
 
  #8  
Old 09-30-05, 07:15 AM
jcyr
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valve replacement

Ok, I will try that.

Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 09-30-05, 04:21 PM
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Try this first

Some Fill-Trol's have a screen located under a hex nut on the Fill-Trol brass body. You might simply have a plugged screen. Turn off the city water valve & remove the hex nut (if yours has one). Remove the screen & clean it. Before reinstalling, turn the water back on just for a second or two to flush out any junk. It helps if you have a helper to hold a bucket at the open Fill-Trol port. If no water comes out of the port, there's no need to go any further. It's shot. Replacing with another Fill-Trol would be a lot easier than the FB-38 but I prefer a separate reducing valve to the Fill-Trol system.
 
  #10  
Old 10-03-05, 05:48 AM
jcyr
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Thanks!

Grady,

Ok, I had an eventful weekend. Without reading your last post, I went ahead and flushed my system with water by hooking up my garden hose to the drain and back filling it with all the bleeder vents wide open. One by one I closed them as air was replaced with water. My boiler pressure is now holding steady at 14 psi cold and kicks up to 20 when hot. I have heat in both zones. I still want to determine why I could not fill my system via the city line, and will try what you said by cleaning the strainer. I am scheduled to have a the boiler serviced later this month to ensure that everything is working order now. Thanks for all your help!

Jason
 
  #11  
Old 10-10-05, 07:22 AM
jcyr
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valve trouble

Since my last post, I have not had any major problems with my furnace. My boiler pressure is holding steady as is my tank pressure. My problem now is that I have two baseboards in the foyer, that run off one of the two zones in my house. these two baseboards are not getting any heat. I have a valve that is located between the furnace and these two baseboards that has a section for a flat head screw driver to fit in and turn it. When I initially was trying to bleed the air from my system, I turned this screw head a few times, and now am not sure if it is open or closed. Based on the fact that I have no heat from that valve on in my system, I would imagine that it is closed. My question is which way should i turn it to open it? And how far? I don't want to mess with too much and have to replace it, that is why i am asking for your help.

thanks

Jason
 
  #12  
Old 10-10-05, 04:50 PM
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Jason

Presuming this valve to be inline rather than on a elbow or tee, these valves are usually a butterfly type. When the screw slot is paralel to the pipe, the valve is fully open. I suggest opening the valve all the way, at least to start.
 
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