Losing Heat up chimney? See pictures of the situation


  #1  
Old 10-13-05, 02:57 PM
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Losing Heat up chimney? See pictures of the situation

.... with the oncoming increase in natural gas prices... (sorry, posted this on wrong forum before and got one answer already)

I already have an expensive situation in my single metered multifamily home. I am looking at the steam boiler in the basement and wondering what my options are in terms of air flow to the boiler and the exhaust of the boiler out the chimney.

The exhaust from the boiler looks like it goes out the back, to a metal box with no bottom. That large metal box opens to the vertical stack, that feeds into the chimney.

Question: Is the bottomless box correct? And, during the OFF times, does not the somewhat warm air in my basement in the winter continue to be sucked up this pipe into the chimney and out? And conversely this vacuum pulls in cold air in the basement to replace what is going up the chimney?

Are there any airflow methods that I can use to stop this heat loss?

I am not using my fireplace by the way, am just concerned about the furnace.

Here is the link to see http://home.comcast.net/~devidasvar...ce_hotwater.htm
 
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Old 10-13-05, 03:54 PM
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Link does not work

Tried the link & tried typing in the web address listed, to no avail.
 
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Old 10-13-05, 04:02 PM
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this link works

sorry, link got truncated in prior post, lets try this:

http://home.comcast.net/~devidasvarg...e_hotwater.htm
 
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Old 10-13-05, 04:10 PM
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That's better

The bottomless box serves as a draft hood. If you were to close it off, you would loose a lot more heat than you do now. The exhaust smell could be from a bad chimney or maybe due to the lack of slope on the water heater vent pipe. Another common problem is lack of ventilation (incoming fresh air).
 
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Old 10-13-05, 04:32 PM
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lack of ventilation

Interesting quandry, I try sealing up the house, and all this heat wants to go up the chimney, but it can only go up if air leaks in to replace the hot air escaping.

For the hot water heater: I can increase the angle of the exhaust but putting in a new hole into the chimney above the existing one.

For the steam boiler: are there any incoming airflow treatments that I might explore using? So that the outside air is used to burn and it goes up the chimney.
 
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Old 10-13-05, 05:26 PM
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Vent angle & ventilation

The vent pipe should rise at least 1/4" for each foot of run, more is better. You also might want to consider replacing that single wall vent with type "B" double wall. It will stay warmer & thus help the draft.

Ventilation: Here is something you might want to look at: http://www.fieldcontrols.com/cas3-4.html
 
 

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