knockdown boilers


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Old 11-04-05, 04:39 PM
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knockdown boilers

I need to replace a boiler in my house. Unfortunately, the boiler is in our crawl space, and the only way to get in is a very small door. So, one option is to get a knockdown boiler and assemble it inside the crawl space. Boilers are normally factory tested to assure a water tight seal. But what about knockdown boilers? If they're assembled at the location (the crawl space, in my case), then there is no factory testing for me? Are there any drawbacks to having a knockdown boiler?

Thank you.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 04:50 PM
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knockdown

The testing is the resposibility of the assembler/installer. Each individual section will have been factory tested. Assembling a knocked down boiler is not a DIY job.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 05:15 PM
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knockdown

Thank you for such a quick reply. I realize it's not a DYI job, and I've contacted a few professionals. Strangely, only one mentioned a knockdown boiler as a possibility, so I'm wondering if getting a knockdown boiler has any disadvantages over having a fully factory-assembled one.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 05:38 PM
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DavidM

As long as your installer is well experienced in assembling knocked down boilers, there is no disadvantage other than the time required for assembly. The advantage is the ease of getting the boiler in place.
 
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Old 11-06-05, 08:58 AM
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Thank you. I also wonder how meaningful the AFUE ratings are. Aren't there are other considerations when considering efficiency of a boiler? Is, for example, 87% vs 83% very significant?
 
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Old 11-06-05, 05:06 PM
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Replacement boiler

If you are going to be in the house long term (10 years+), I would suggest going with the more efficient boiler. The faster & more the energy prices rise, the faster the payback.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 04:55 PM
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My boiler saga will never end. We were about to put a new one in, when I noticed that it had a top cleanout. The boiler is going into a crawl space, so the distance between its top and ceiling is no more than 6-8 inches. The maintenance manual says: "To thoroughly clean the boiler it must be brushed down from the top. Alternatively, for limited space or minimum clearance to combustible installations, cleaning the heat exchanger from the combusion chamber side is acceptable."

Can a top cleanout boiler be still cleaned adequately with only 6-8 inch clearance? Is that side cleaning an acceptable alternative? Is it just as good?

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 05:12 PM
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Boiler cleaning

So I can better answer your question, the make & model of the boiler would be helpful. If it is one with which I am familiar, I can draw on my experience if not I'll look it up on the web. I certainy hope this boiler is rear vented.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 06:03 PM
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Thank you. I'm talking about Peerless WBV-03 boiler. It is a rear flue boiler convertible to top flue.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 06:11 PM
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Peerless

I am quite familiar with this boiler & in order to do a proper cleaning, you have to brush from the top. It can be done from the chamber side but you will have one heck of a time getting out the debris on the top of the sections.
If you do not have a domestic coil, I suggest either the Crown CT series or Burnham's new MPO boiler. Here are a couple of links so you can look at them:
http://www.crownboiler.com
http://www.burnham.com
 
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Old 11-09-05, 07:12 PM
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Thanks very much! What do you think about Energy Kinetics System 2000? Is it worth considering?
 
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Old 11-09-05, 07:33 PM
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System 2000

Another moderator, KField, & I have completely different views when it comes to the System 2000. Personally, I hate them. He, on the other hand, loves them. I don't like any steel boiler. As far as I'm concerned, if it isn't cast iron, it should be cast out. My employer used to be a dealer for Energy Kinetics but quit handling them because of customer complaints about high maintenance costs. I have a CT-3 in my house & liked it so well I put in a
CT-5 for my dad. I personally know of 3 System 2000's that were junked because the customer disliked them so.
If Ken sees this, he'll be on me like a cheap suit. LOL
 
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Old 11-10-05, 07:49 PM
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Thank you very much for all your advice. On a somewhat unrelated note -- does using Liquid Plug (I believe that's the name of it) to temporarily seal holes in a leaking boiler affect the pipes? Can that stuff clog the pipes all over the house?
 
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Old 11-10-05, 07:58 PM
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Boiler Sealer

I've seen it ruin auto vents, maybe even zone valves or flow checks, but not pipes. If this stuff has been used in your system, I do suggest a thorough flushing with cold water prior to installing a new boiler. All automatic air vents will need to be replaced with new ones.
 
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Old 11-10-05, 08:05 PM
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Boiler in Crawl Space

Have you ever considered putting the boiler in a small storage building next to the house or even in the back yard. The pipes could be well insulated & run underground in a 6" PVC pipe. This is common practice for those who have outdoor wood burning boilers. I have seen several houses done the same way. I doubt the cost would be a lot more than the labor involved in having to assemble & install a boiler in a crawl space, not to mention a whole lot easier to service.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 06:14 AM
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Yes, I'm considering that too, but we are in upstate New York and it gets quite cold here. With the boiler outside, wouldnt' we be heating the great outdoors?

Also, someone mentioned to me Burnham boiler model 28571L. I went to their website, but there is no mention of such model. Any idea what it is? Thanks.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 11:22 AM
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HB Smith is a good boiler for a crawl space just be sure to get it with a Carlin burner.
 
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Old 11-13-05, 06:18 AM
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Boiler outdoors

If you put the boiler in a small building & insulate the building well you will have very little heat loss.
I looked in one of my catalogs & could not find a Burnham model with a number close to the one you mention.
 
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Old 11-18-05, 03:36 AM
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Thanks for all your advice throughout this. We finally had a new boiler and water heater installed yesterday. One question I have is: hot water now has a very distinct kind of paraffin smell. Should I expect this to go away soon? Is that from soldering or is the new water heater doing it?
 
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Old 11-18-05, 04:54 PM
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Smell

It is most likely the soldering flux being washed out. What boiler did you end up with?
 
 

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