Adding heating zone


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Old 11-24-05, 10:31 AM
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Smile Adding heating zone

I have thick pipe going along the perimeter of the house from boiler and back (oil furnace) in the basement. Then thin pipes, which connected to the thick one in different places, go to the upper floors to radiators.

I would like to add at least one control zone to the heating system.
The idea is to
- add valves to each INPUT thin pipe connected to the thick one.
- the valves will be electrically controlled by a system that switches them on/off. Potentially I want to install one valve to the input of each radiator (14 in total) so that I can control each radiator independently.

Questions:
- what valves would you recommend?
- how is this idea in general; any links how to do it?
- how much parts and labor can cost?
- are there another cheaper ways?
 
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Old 11-24-05, 10:52 AM
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Eklmn

From what you describe about the piping arrangement, it sounds like you have a venturi (mono-flo) tee system. I think thermostatic radiator valves might be the answer but I am not sure how well the system would work if only a couple of radiators were calling for heat.
 
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Old 11-25-05, 05:47 PM
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>I think thermostatic radiator valves might be the answer but I am not sure how well the system would work if only a couple of radiators were calling for heat.

Hi Grady,

do you mean that it is better to attach valves to radiators instead of the pipes which go to the radiators?
I was thinking about that as second approach, but pulling wires from each
radiator to one place can be an issue.

As to just turning on a couple of radiators, I think that real number of control zones will be equal to the number of rooms. You have a good point that probably more than two valves should be turned on at same time, so rooms having one radiator should be combined into one zone.

interesting how much it can cost?
Here are some initial info from ebay:
honeywell valve ~$40+$5(shipping) * 14 = $630
not sure how much would be labor? Any ideas ?
I can do wiring and control myself, but control can cost at least a few hundred if I want to control it from the Internet .
 
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Old 11-26-05, 04:31 PM
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Eklmn

From the way you describe your system, I believe it to a venturi or Mono-Flo tee system. I really think if you severely restrict the flow by use of multiple zone or thermostatic radiator valves you will experience trouble. Maybe if you used 3-way zone valves with a pipe by-passing the radiator(s) you would be ok. I'm not sure if Dan Holohan has any books on his web site on such subjects but it's worth a look. http://www.heatinghelp.com
 

Last edited by Grady; 11-26-05 at 04:34 PM. Reason: correct web address
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Old 11-26-05, 05:36 PM
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Yep. I looked how Monoflo system works. One of links is here http://www.bellgossett.com/Press/monoflo.html
I thought that thick pipe is a simple one.
So it is not a question of valves but entire system.

Before giving up on my solution I would like to be sure that my system consists of pairs of standard and Monoflo tees. I took a few shots and put on the web http://stopby.net/public/heater/index.htm . Could you look and confirm that my pipe system is exactly what you assumed, i.e. Monoflo?

Thanks for your time,
Ek
 
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Old 11-26-05, 05:58 PM
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Mono-Flo Tees

Excellent shots, THANKS. Judging from the proximity of the tees, the fact some have labels (every other one?), & the installation of convectors (each with a bleeder, the only way to bleed a mono-flo tee system), I would say with 99.99% certainty, you do indeed have a mono-flo tee system. That B&G web site is full of great information about hydronic systems.
The only way I can see your idea working is with 3 way zone valves, with the branch (normally open) by passing the convector. With this being all steel pipe you are looking at a mega (maybe giga, ) amout of work.
 
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Old 11-26-05, 06:17 PM
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Arrow

Bad news. Certainly not work for winter season.
To close this thread as I understand you suggest the following solution http://stopby.net/public/heater/new1.bmp
or maybe http://stopby.net/public/heater/new2.bmp

Ek
 

Last edited by Eklmn; 11-26-05 at 07:04 PM.
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Old 11-27-05, 07:56 AM
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Agreed

Certainly not a job for this time of year. I think the second option would be the prefered route. You could saw out the steel pipe & replace it with copper. The hard part might be getting the steel out of the tee & radiator. If you opt to go this route & think about using heat (torch) to help loosen the pipe joints, be aware that much of the paint could contain lead.
 
 

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