Hot Pipes cold Radiators


  #1  
Old 11-24-05, 11:04 AM
Weekend_Warrior
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Hot Pipes cold Radiators

I have a hot water baseboard system, all one zone with the thermostat on the first floor (split-level house) in the living room.

Problem is, the upstairs radiators do not eat up. I have replaced all of the bleeders with autobleeders. Replacing the bleeders on the upstaris rads was a completely dry process- unlike the downstairs units.

The main line to the rads in question gets hot, but the smaller lines coming off of it, going to the rads stay cold (or barely warm), thereby keeping the rads cold.

I think the problem is the fact that my pressure guage reads just under 10psi. I know this is too low, but how do I boost it? I have an outo fill valve on my system, so shouldn't it keep the pressure just right?
 

Last edited by Weekend_Warrior; 11-24-05 at 11:23 AM.
  #2  
Old 11-24-05, 11:28 AM
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Auto fill valve

When functioning properly, the auto fill (pressure reducing) valve should keep the pressure at about 12#. Make sure valves in the line to & from the reducing valve are open. If they are, loosen the lock nut on the top of the reducing valve & turn the screw in 1-2 turns. Watch the gauge & when it gets to 12# or a little more, turn the screw back to it's original position.
 
  #3  
Old 11-24-05, 12:15 PM
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Locknut?

Originally Posted by Grady
When functioning properly, the auto fill (pressure reducing) valve should keep the pressure at about 12#. Make sure valves in the line to & from the reducing valve are open. If they are, loosen the lock nut on the top of the reducing valve & turn the screw in 1-2 turns. Watch the gauge & when it gets to 12# or a little more, turn the screw back to it's original position.
The only 'screw' I see is a post with a lever on it that rotates to a vertical position. below that is a nut. Is this what you are referring to?
 
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Old 11-24-05, 01:38 PM
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Locknut

One and the same.
 
  #5  
Old 11-25-05, 09:34 AM
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No result

Originally Posted by Weekend_Warrior
The only 'screw' I see is a post with a lever on it that rotates to a vertical position. below that is a nut. Is this what you are referring to?
Well, I've monkeyed with the above and had no result. The Reducing Valve is a Watts unit and I've tried the screw all the way in, out, in between and I've even take it out. The unit is supposed to have a spring loaded diaphragm. After monkeying with it, I see no indaction of a spring actuator.

Anyway, based on your advuce and my attepts to follow it, it appears this valve is bad. Is this something I can replace myself- It looks fairly straightforward- or will all of the water in the system 'dackdrain out if I attempt it???
 
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Old 11-25-05, 10:06 AM
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Replacing PRV

Unless there is a valve between the reducing valve & the boiler, the water will drain if there are no shut off valves on the supply & return lines. Even then if the PRV feeds into the bottom of the boiler, the boiler will drain. If you end up draining the system or boiler, I strongly suggest you install a valve between the PRV & the boiler. I always put valves on both sides of the PRV & at least one union. That way, when I have to change the reducing valve, all I have to do is shut off the valves & open the union. You only lose the little bit of water between the valves. BTW, the union must be between the reducing valve & the shut off valve, otherwise it is useless.
 
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Old 11-25-05, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Grady
Unless there is a valve between the reducing valve & the boiler, the water will drain if there are no shut off valves on the supply & return lines. Even then if the PRV feeds into the bottom of the boiler, the boiler will drain. If you end up draining the system or boiler, I strongly suggest you install a valve between the PRV & the boiler. I always put valves on both sides of the PRV & at least one union. That way, when I have to change the reducing valve, all I have to do is shut off the valves & open the union. You only lose the little bit of water between the valves. BTW, the union must be between the reducing valve & the shut off valve, otherwise it is useless.
I have a valve just before the PRV and the only 'downstream' valve I can find is on the main line to the rads, afterv the furnace and curculator.

To me that means the boiler and the water in the line up to that valve will drain. And I read somewhere that adding a lot of fresh water to a system is not good (can this be?).

So it looks like I am calling a plumber(?). But a plumber will have the same problem, no?
 
  #8  
Old 11-25-05, 11:12 AM
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Plumber

The plumber will have the same problem unless he has either a line freezer or a device to shove up in the pipe to stop the water while he solders on a valve. Ideally you should keep the addition of fresh water to a minimum but sometimes you don't have much choice.
 
 

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