Baseboard before floor?


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Old 11-28-05, 07:49 AM
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Baseboard before floor?

I am finishing a room that will have baseboard heat. But the floor is not down yet. (just a subfloor is). Since I am tryingto take advantage of time I am going to do my heat at night. My floor would be last (after painting) and during the day (no banging for kids sake)

So, the question is, can I install baseboard heat before an oak floor? Or does the baseboard need to sit on top of the floor, and holes need to be drilled through it also

Can I door the baseboard before the floor? If so, what is the best way to do this?
 
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Old 11-28-05, 01:24 PM
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Hi. I'm a first time poster, but qualified to comment since I just finished doing this (putting down oak floor over subfloor in 3 rooms that already had baseboard heat -- man that 70s-vintage carpet was hideous. Good riddance!). Sure, put in the baseboards before the floor. No problem. One disadvantage, however, is that depending on which direction you lay the floor, it may be more difficult to use a flooring jack to help straighten crooked/bowed boards -- it can be tricky to get good jack pressure against a wall that has baseboard heat on it. If the heat wall is your long (starting) wall, or the flooring goes under the baseboard at right angles (e.g., start or end of a course), then it's quite simple. Finishing on the heat wall is where it can get painstaking.

If I had to do it from scratch, I'd probably get the heat rough-plumbed so that the stubs are in place. Then cut out the oak flooring to fit around (U-shaped cut) or over (hole saw) the stubs. Just leave yourself enough wiggle room (literally) for the stubs. Then install the baseboard units. Good luck.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 01:56 PM
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" flooring jack to help straighten crooked/bowed boards "????

HUH?

wont the floor planks be stright? I just assumed they lay downand lock into one an other.

Anyway, I guess Ill owrry about that when I getto it.

For the baseboard, this might be a dumb question, bt how do you know where to put the stubs for the rough in? I can figure out distance from the wall - based on the depth of the baseborad. But as far as left and right (ends of the baseboard) how do you determine?
 
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Old 11-28-05, 02:27 PM
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Since you have the option, I would always put the floor down first, then paint, then the heat. If you put the floor down after the heat, you will reduce airflow through the baseboards or have to cut the floor back to the point of looking sloppy, just to make the heat work properly.

Yeah even new oak flooring is warped - just like all wood warps. If you expect a nice job with tight joints you will have to jack each row tight against the previously nailed row by jacking off of a cleat temporarily nailed to the subfloor or the opposing wall as you close in on it. Use a large board to not crush the drywall. I highly reccomend doing more research on this if you don't want an amateur looking job. Hardwood is not Pergo. Good information is on the NOFMA site.

If your supply and return are not already finished in place I would get the whole floor down and done. Next, solder/assemble your baseboard (multiple sections?) with the endcaps in place. From there you can measure where the elbows drop in relation to your wall(s). With careful measuring you can mark the spots and hole saw through. Then drop your baseboard and stub connections into the holes, fasten to the wall, and finish the supply and returns. Are you on a 2nd floor? Do you have to go into the walls for your piping? If so, adjust the procedure to work. If the supply and return are set, you may have to adapt the element in the baseboard to match.

I paint after the flooring. It's easier to protect the new floor from drippings than prevent marks/damage to new paint when jacking and moving planks.

Good luck!
 
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Old 11-28-05, 03:39 PM
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Floor first

As Syakoban said do the floor first. Assemble the baseboad (dry fit is ok), mount the back panel to the wall, install pipe stubs to just above the floor, measure from the wall out & from the corner in. Put a mark on the floor around the pipe stub. Lift out the element & use a small bit or coat hanger to drill down thru the floor. Go into the basement or crawl space to make sure you will clear the floor joists. Once you are satisfied on placement use a
1 1/8" hole saw for your pipes. You can put fiberglass around the pipe after it is in. This extra space around the pipe will lessen the expansion noise.
 
 

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