Inspecting a boiler to see if it is bad


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Old 12-02-05, 02:43 PM
cco1
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Inspecting a boiler to see if it is bad

I had a new oil deealer come inspect my system as I am looking to change oil dealers. This person tells me my boiler is cracke by looking at the back of the unit and condems my unit. I ask him to remove the cover and show me the crack and he refuses telling me he does not have to to know it is cracked.

He leaves and I remove the cover, do no see any cracks, I see at the top of the boiler a little bulge about 2 inches long and an inch wide. How do we know about a crack?
 
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Old 12-02-05, 04:33 PM
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cco1

Time to call the new company & tell them in no uncertain terms of your dissatisfaction. Then call another company.
 
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Old 12-03-05, 08:12 AM
cco1
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Thamkyou, I already called and voiced my opinion, just not sure if I would see a crack or that a bukge is normal. Is a bulge normal

I called in another company that said the unit is old, it is not cracked but should be replaced. My old company told me it would be good for 2 years.

Confusion reign, I have one person says do not use it it is a fire hazard, another syas it is fine and a third says it is ok but should be replaced shortly.

Back to what is the bulge is there anything one can tell by inspection? The boiler is a Columbia steel boiler it is 20 years old

Thanks for any help
 
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Old 12-03-05, 05:01 PM
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Bulge in boiler

I would doubt that there is a fire hazzard. Can't say for sure but I would doubt it. Needing to be replaced soon does not mean it has to be done right now. From the sound of things, you should be doing your homework this winter & be ready to do something in the spring after the heating season is over. Since I am not there & don't know where the bulge is, or how bad, I obviously can't say for sure either way. Steel boilers have a habit of bulging in some places but should never bulge in others.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 01:50 PM
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Thankyou

The boiler is a Columbia, it is 20 years old. All this got me thinking I should buy a new one anyway.

So now the dilema cast vs steel? I am out on Long Island 2 really cold months is the extra effiency 83% vs 85%-87% worth all the money?

Then if it is steel is it a new yorker or a burnham, if it is cast is it peerless or wiel mclain? Looking at effienciency there is very little difference and the oil company services it any way so what does one decide?
 
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Old 12-05-05, 05:35 PM
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Steel vs. Cast

In my book it is a no brainer. CAST IRON. Burnham also makes some excellent cast boilers such as their V8 & new MPO. A couple of my personal favorites are Crown's CT series & Buderus 115 or 215. Especially the Buderus is kind of pricey but from what I've seen, worth the money. I have a Crown CT in my house & it runs almost 88% combustion efficiency.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 05:56 PM
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Thanks Grady.

The cast iron will cost $1,000 more, is it really worth that much? the steel is $3,000 and the cast iron is $4,000.

Is the steel Burnham RSA125 with a Carlin burner good? The other Steel boiler is a new yorker with a reillo burner. Is there any real diffrence between them?

On the cast iron it is a peerlees vs weil mclean. The oil compaineis do it this way so those seem to be my choices.

In each category wich would you recommend? I do not have a choice to get the burnham cast iron.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 06:09 PM
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Boiler choice

Trust me, on Long Island you have a choice of any boiler made. You may have to make some phone calls but somebody up there sells better boilers. Of the options given there is only one of the bunch I would have & that is the Peerless. Are they quoting the WBV or EC series boiler? I have had way too many bad experiences with Weil-McLain to even consider one.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 06:16 PM
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The Peerless is a WBV3 or an ECT is another option. Your recomendation is the Burnham cast iren v8 series?
 
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Old 12-05-05, 06:22 PM
cco1
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you know in the 20 years I have had the columbia boiler, the only problem I have had is the circulator went in each zone. After 20 years I have no compliants.

On long island most of the dealers have a brand they sell and require you to take their oil if they insatll a system.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 06:25 PM
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Grady, what do you fish for?

I know how to fish but I still have to work to pay the fuel bills.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 06:33 PM
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Boilers/ Long Island

With the prices you quoted, I suspect what they are doing is discounting the boiler & making it up with the price of oil.

If you have a domestic coil in the boiler & intend to replace with the same configuration, yes, the Burnham V8 series is a good choice. If you do not have a domestic coil, I would stay away from any "pin" boiler. Pin boilers tend to get a lot dirtier than 3 pass style boilers such as the Burnham MPO, Crown CT, or Buderus. A good boiler should last 40 years or more.

For more money, you could go with an indirect water heater on any boiler but the 3 pass style works better.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 02:45 PM
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Grady,

What is the difference on the peerless boilers between a WBV3 or an ECT?
 
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Old 12-16-05, 04:57 PM
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Peerless

The WBV series is a smaller, less expensive line. The EC is a superior boiler. It's biggest draw back, from an operating cost stand point, is it has a larger water volume. That means you have a lot more water sitting there doing nothing except cooling off when the boiler is idle. On the other hand, the EC/ECT has a higher AFUE (annual fuel utilization efficiency). You can compare them your self at http:www.peerlessboilers.com
 
 

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