gas hot water heat question


  #1  
Old 12-02-05, 05:26 PM
kim
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gas hot water heat question

the spigot for draining water out of system is dripping constantly. I have opened and closed valve a dozen times to see if maybe sediment was the problem. Well it still leaks. Does anyone know of the best type or brand of spigot to purchase that wont drip. It seems every year I have to replace these. The only time I open them is once a year to drain the water. I have a tri llevel so I have three spigots. All are leaking with one dripping at fast pace and other two very slowly.
kim
 
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Old 12-02-05, 05:39 PM
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Kim

Why do you open them & drain the system? One of the worst things you can do to a hot water heating system is to add fresh water & that is exactly what you are doing when you refill the system. To answer your original question: I have had best luck using the ball valve type of boiler drains. They are often not easy to find nor inexpensive. You could install brass hose caps on the leaking valves.
 
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Old 12-03-05, 06:57 AM
kim
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Grady,
Can you explain why adding fresh water is the worse thing to do? Am I damaging the system by doing this? The brass hose caps are a good idea. Thanks for your response.
kim
 
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Old 12-03-05, 07:53 AM
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Adding water

Water, the most universal solvent known to man, is either deposit forming or corrosive in your heating system. After water has been in the system for a while, it has either left all of the deposits or eaten all it is going to & becomes "neutral". By adding fresh water, you start the process all over again. Water also contains dissolved oxygen which comes out of solution as the water is heated. Oxygen is THE major killer of boilers. On a lot of commercial boilers where water is frequently added, they treat the water with an oxygen scavenger chemical to prevent boiler damage.
Now that I have scared the crap out of you , please refrain from adding any more water than absolutely necessary.
 
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Old 12-03-05, 10:18 AM
kim
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WOW!!!
I guess you did scare the crap out of me. I guess I won't be doing that anymore!!! Thank you so much for the information. From now on I will just purge the air out every year if that is ok to do. So how long does that process take to become neutral? How long will I have to pay extra attention to any leaks that may occur from draining? I have drained the pipes every year for 20 years now so I guess I'm lucky I haven't had any leaks!!! Thanks again for all your help.
kim
 
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Old 12-03-05, 04:47 PM
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WOW is right

After 20 years of draining & refilling it is indeed a wonder you have not had leaks. How long does it take to become "neutral"? That is a very good question to which there is no definate answer. It all depends on how close to "neutral" the water is when it is introduced into the system. Sorry I can't do any better than that. My philosophy on air is if you don't hear it & the system works fine, leave sleeping dogs lie. Didn't mean to scare the crap out of you but I knew once I got into water chemistry it would. Draining steam boilers used to be, & sometimes still is, common practice. Hot water systems should not be drained unless absolutely needed.
 
  #7  
Old 12-06-05, 05:51 AM
shadester21
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Cool Hello Kim

undefined Heating systems are closed systems. It seems to me if your adding water all the time ,two easy solutions are automate fills & pressurized air expansions tanks help to make your system produce better heat. Keeping a higher even pressure on your system allows for more efficient heat. With an air scoop on the feed & purge valves on the return most of the air will be gone. Once the system is purged & put into operation you should not have to add water after it is up & running.These are just easy solutions to try first. David
 
 

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