Replacing HW heater maybe tankless??


  #1  
Old 12-05-05, 11:21 AM
Noel
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Replacing HW heater maybe tankless??

I currently have a 40 gal HW heater and it does not supply enough HW. I have added Washing machine and Dishwasher and have 2 bathrooms in which I added a spa tub. I don't have a lot of room in the boiler room which currrently has the Hot water heater and the Boiler (both gas) right next to each other. The boiler is slated for replacement too, but I have some cash issues. So maybe next year.
I am considering a tankless system but I'm concerned with longevity.
I live in NY.

Thanks for any help offered

Noel
 
  #2  
Old 12-05-05, 05:45 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Tankless

Do you mean a tankless coil in the boiler or a stand alone tankless? I don't think a tankless coil in the boiler will come close to suppling your needs. I am not real familiar with the free standing ones other than the small point of use models.
 
  #3  
Old 12-09-05, 01:58 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 35
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I am having a tankless unit installed next week. It's made by Noritz. The
life of the unit is aproximately 15-20 years.
 
  #4  
Old 12-09-05, 02:30 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
are34, The life of the unit means nothing if it doesn't supply enough hot water. Just that you will have longer to suffer with it. Tankless heaters are more expensive and not all plumbers will work on them. This means a "specialist" if you have problems. Specialist means ......more money. I read most of the posts here concerning tankless heaters and the ratio of good to bad is not good. Best of luck with yours.
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-05, 07:29 AM
fixitron's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Warren, Vermont
Posts: 327
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
A tankless water heater can be a very good option. The good side is that they heat water continuously, so there is no tank to run out. The downside is that they are designed to provide X number of gallons of hot water per minute, at a given temperature rise. None will fill your spa, do the laundry and let you take a shower at the same time, but if you did each of these sequentially, you would not run out of hot water. I service some gas heaters that have been installed for over twenty years and still work well. Now there are propane and natural gas fired models that direct vent and there are electric models so big that they may require a new electric service. If you have corrosive or hard water or have a lot of sediment in your water, no water heater will last for long without problems. You might also consider two instantaneous water heaters, closer to their point of use. Flowrates are in the range of 1.5-2.5 gpm at 110F with cold water at 50F. A lower flowrate will give a higher output temperature.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: