Flushing Heating System


  #1  
Old 12-07-05, 07:05 AM
neumonik
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Flushing Heating System

I've been reading up on heating system maintenance and came across a web page talking about flushing heating systems. The idea is much like back flushing a cars cooling system, to dislodge slug and scale.

I have a pretty old oil boiler and I'm looking to stretch its life as long as I can. From what I've read it will increase the efficiency of the system as a whole and increase the heat output of the radiators. I've been checking mine and they are showing the signs that the web page pointed out as being slug build-up problems. Hot on top cold on bottom. I've bled the air from the lines which helped in a few rooms.

Can anyone give any input on this? Does anyone know of someone in NE PA that does this and how much it would run?

Thanks. :mask:
 
  #2  
Old 12-07-05, 05:06 PM
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Flushing heating system

I soundly disagree with flushing a system unless absolutely necessary. Adding fresh water to a heating system is one of the worst things you can do to it.
 
  #3  
Old 12-08-05, 05:35 AM
neumonik
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At the risk of sound stupid... why is it bad to add fresh water to a heating system? Isn't it worse to keep bad water in?

If the system is apart, say durring the installation of a new furnace is it something that should be done then since it's all apart anyway?

Here is the link that got me asking about it.. i know this is a UK company.
http://www.kamco.co.uk/powerflushing.htm
 
  #4  
Old 12-08-05, 02:29 PM
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No dumb question

Water, the most universal solvent known to man, is by it's nature either aggressive or deposit forming. Over time in a closed system the water has done all of the damage it is going to do & becomes neutral. When you add fresh water you start the process all over again. I have seen new boilers eaten out in less than ten years due to the constant infusion of fresh water.
If you are changing out a boiler & want to flush the system, fine, but once the system if filled, the introduction of fresh water should be kept to a minimum.
 
 

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