Baseboard heat problem


  #1  
Old 01-05-06, 06:31 PM
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Question Baseboard heat problem

Hi.

My husband and I bought a home last June, and it has baseboard (forced hot water) heat. All the baseboards in the house work, except for one bedroom.

There is no shutoff valve in each room, but there is a pressure release valve on each heater. The one in my son's room is missing the cap. When you feel the copper pipe that comes up into the baseboard in that room from the basement, it feels hot, but I guess the hot water never "flows" through the rest of the baseboard.

What can cause this, do I need to replace the pressure release valve, and how difficult is it to do that? (it doesn't seem difficult, but I also don't know if hot water is going to come shooting out of it if I remove it.)

Any ideas?

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 01-05-06, 11:33 PM
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Baseboard Heat

GumbyMager:

The "pressure release valve" you refer to on the baseboard is either a bleeder valve or a thermostatic radiator valve (TRV); the bleeder valve is approx 1" in diameter; the TRV is about 5" high.

The inoperative baseboard may be full of air & needs to be opened to get the air out, which would involve the bleeder; there is usually a small slot in the valve where a small screwdriver can fit to turn it slightly counter clockwise to vent the air; some bleeders have a small square insert that requires a special bleeder key, obtainable at home improvement stores or plumbing supply stores.

You may have to remove an end piece of the baseboard metal cover to freely access the bleeder; surround the base of the valve with a large wad of paper toweling to catch the water, then open it until you see water trickle out; turn clockwise to close.

If you are referring to the larger valve (TRV); it's probably in the closed position & should be able to be opened without the cap; see if there's any protrusions on the housing that can be manually moved or get the mfg's name & model # from one of the other baseboard valves & buy a replacement cap at a plumbing supply store.

To see a diagram of what these valves look like, Google the phrase "thermostatic radiator valve", and then Google "baseboard bleeder valve" (both with quotes) until you find a site where they are illustrated.
 

Last edited by Chimney Cricket; 01-06-06 at 12:01 AM.
  #3  
Old 01-07-06, 07:40 AM
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Chimney Cricket

Okay. I moved the dresser that was near the valve, and the carpet was all wet. I then found the bleeder valve cap under the baseboard heater. I put it back on.

In talking with my husband, we believe that the valve itself must be clogged or something. Apparently, the water drips out of the valve (since the cap was missing), but not into the actual baseboard heater. Why else would the hot water not pass through to the pipe in the baseboard heater?

How complicated is it, and what do I need to look out for in replacing the actual valve? Is hot water going to shoot out of the pipes? Do I need to shut the heater off or the water supply?

thanks again,

GumbyMager
 
  #4  
Old 01-07-06, 12:22 PM
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okay

well, we can scratch this post, we found the problem. There was a hidden flow valve that was shut off in that room.

thanks for your help!

GumbyMager
 
 

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