oil furnace(boiler)


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Old 01-07-06, 08:43 PM
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oil furnace

I have an old oil furnace that has one problem & can't seem to resolve as follows. I have an after effect on the nozzle it dribbles oil for a minute or so?
This soots up the nozzle and sometimes the electrodes. The pump has been changed afew days ago. THere are no air or oil leaks it runs ok at on and off intervals, but does clog? All filters have been changed.
What is causing the oil dribble after shutdown.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 05:10 AM
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Hello meathead, afterdrip is caused by the overheating of the oil in the line between the fuel pump and the nozzle. It is as simple as that. But finding the cause can be tough. If there is anything in the house that can cause a negative pressure, look there first. A large range hood, bathroom fan, or any other fan that removes air from the house. I have seen radon fans do it when the sump pit was not sealed. When the burner shuts down, the super hot air inside the combustion chamber is pulled back the air tube and heats up the oil and it expands and drips. Another cause as you already eluded to is a suction leak on the fuel pump. If you have any comprression fittings in the fuel line, get rid of them now...even if they look fine. One other thing that happens on burners with long drawer assemblies is that when the nozzle is changed and the oil is emptied from the nozzle line, it gets filled with air. It can take a few days for the air to work its way out of that line. Some newer burners do things to reduce the amount of oil that is in the nozzle line but older burners had large lines and they were a problem. The reason i mentioned the last one is because if you are seeking the source of the problem and keep taking the nozzle assembly out, you will never get the air out. Post back with any other questions. Say Hi to Edith.


Ken
 
  #3  
Old 01-08-06, 04:16 PM
splippity
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you could also try a magnetic sulinoid.........
goes between the pump and the nozzle assembly....

once the fan gets up to speed it'll click open and allow fuel flow and then it'll close when the fan stops.... so no more oil can flow, thus stopping the drip.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 04:23 PM
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Good suggestion splippity. If the pump wasn't new as he said, I would have suggested that too. It is less expensive than replacing a pump when the cutoff is failing but with a new pump, the cutoff should not be a factor.

Ken
 
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Old 01-08-06, 09:18 PM
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nozzle drip

Hi Guys thanks for the Info.
I have replaced the pump it's NEW .
Even tried a delayed action solenoid. You could be right about taking the nozzle out & getting air in the line but it soots up around the nozzle and does not pump unless taken out & cleaned. Will a different nozzle do the trick??
1. 35 gph is what is called for I am using a 80H ? not certain if it's the right one. Any answers
And thanks for your help.

said hello to EDITH.
 
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Old 01-09-06, 09:55 AM
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You can buy a nozzle with a built in check valve. 1.35 gph is a big nozzle.
 
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Old 01-09-06, 01:03 PM
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Nozzles

Thanks
Didn't know that they made nozzles with built in check valves.
1.35GPH is what the furnace calls for.
If i fit a smaller one what will be the results!! I'm not sure of the type angle
etc whether it should be a hollow solid one. This is an old American Standard. Have changed the blast tube 2 times it is now all melting in places.
What is your diagnostic on this.
 
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Old 01-09-06, 02:30 PM
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The combustion tube should not extend into the firebox more than inch. I am wondering if it is being over fired. What are the specs on the furnace, model number, btu input ,output. Burner make, model, firing rates. Is this a furnace or a boiler, sometimes people use that term interchangeable.The gph, angle and type is stamped on the nozzle, on the flats. Example: .75 80 B
 
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Old 01-09-06, 05:44 PM
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nozzle

Hi Back again
The only info I have is the plate on furnace, as follows
A-3 Oil Boiler No A34P SEries 1BJ1 Valve Cap136
Gross Output 136
WaterMbh 102 Firing per hr 1.35 That's it
The burner assembly hooks on the front a hook on job?
I have not measured how much goes into the combustion chamber but it's more than you mentioned. going ito the c/ chamber
 
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Old 01-09-06, 05:44 PM
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Another possibility

The heat on the blast tube & nozzle could be caused by a broken heat exchanger or blown gasket. A crude test for this is to hold a match, lighter, candle, incense stick, etc. in front of the flame observation hole & watch the flame/smoke. It should be drawn into the furnace. Then turn the fan on manually. If the flame/smoke comes back toward you, there is a real good chance you have a heat exchanger problem. The flame does not have to be on to do this but the furnace should be warm.

If I recall correctly, the old American Standard furnaces had a large round plate on the front of the heat exchanger into which the burner tube is inserted. If the gasket under this plate is blown out, you will get back pressure when the fan is on.
 
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Old 01-10-06, 09:46 AM
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I have no experience on boilers, Grady can take over.
 
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Old 01-10-06, 01:25 PM
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To say that boiler/burner is a relic is like saying an atom is small. I would recommend that you have a reputable oil burner tech service the unit and adjust as well as can be done. That burner can make soot faster than a goose makes...... well, use your imagination. It would be a shame to have the house covered in soot from a 55 year old burner and your insurance company won't pay a dime because you had it apart. It can happen more easily than you may think. Then you will change to gas because you will say that oil heat is dirty. The truth is that if you had a modern oil system in there you would be astounded at the savings and lack of maintenance required as compared to your existing system. And the cost for a new boiler and associated components would only be about $1000 more than a total house cleaning/repainting from a puffback that wasn't covered by insurance. I'm not trying to scold you but you should view the facts head-on.

Ken
 

Last edited by KField; 01-11-06 at 05:08 AM. Reason: clarity
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Old 01-10-06, 03:39 PM
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New boiler/burner

Somehow I missed the post about this being an A3 boiler, so my comments about a cracked heat exchanger would not be valid.

Ken has a very good point. Modern equipment, properly sized, even though not inexpensive, can be one of the best investments you can make. I have personally seen people cut their heating bills in half. Even if you only save 15-20% on your heating costs, where else can you get that kind of return on your investment.
If you can't afford a new boiler, for under $1000, you could have a modern burner installed.
 
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Old 01-10-06, 09:36 PM
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oil Burner

Oil boiler

You Guys have been very helpful in more ways than one and I appreciate it.
youre right about todays heat efficiently units.
I will probably land up having the old clunker taken out and install a modern
efficient gas unit.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-11-06, 05:40 PM
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New Boiler

The choice of fuel is up to you but I wouldn't be too quick to jump on the gas bandwagon. Some modern oil fired equipment has AFUE ratings of nearly 88%.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 08:02 PM
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New Boiler

New Boiler

Even if I decide to install a new oil furnace there is or could be a oil tank problem or possibley a leak? The house was built in 1956. I have nowhere in my basement to put an inside tank. And the location outside is practically impossible, so that leaves me one option to install a new 550 in the ground.
And that means big bucks. At this moment I have a lot of heat towards the front of the furnace, and is extremely( HOT) The Bolt on unit housing where the oil burner hangs on is extreme heat in fact you could fry an egg. But inside there is a stainless steel plate that is partially burnt away is that the heat exchanger, did I also say the blast tube is all burn away I did replace it some time ago it didn't last long?? The problem is that plate or heat exchange part replaceable?? What is your expert advice
Thanks Again
 
 

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