Bleeding Hot Water Radiators


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Old 01-13-06, 08:45 AM
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Question Bleeding Hot Water Radiators

I helped a friend remove some old radiators so they could repair and repaint the old plaster walls. They had a new Energy Kinetics System 2000 furnace fitted up to provide hot water circulation through old cast iron radiators instead of traditional baseboard units.

We drained all the units and supply lines and removed them. Now we are ready to put them back and fill the system back up.

Is there any special trick to bleeding a system like this? Each radiator has a bleeder valve on top, and the furnace has one just near the return side pipe.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks Jim
 
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Old 01-13-06, 05:26 PM
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Jim N

I moved your post because you are dealing with a boiler.

Make sure the bleeders are closed, open the water supply to the boiler, there should be a shut off valve below the purge valve on the boiler, close it & open the purge valve. Manually open all zone valves. When you get a steady flow of water out of the purge valve close it. Allow the system to come up to pressure & starting at the radiator closest to the boiler, bleed them one at a time thru the radiator bleed valves. Once you get water out of each bleeder, close the zone valves & fire up the boiler.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 01:54 PM
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Thanks..follow up pressure ?

Grady, I did open the 2 zone valves and force water into the system using the PRV inlet. We went around and bled each radiator on the 1st floor, and then the second floor.

With the system off we had about 15-18 psi of pressure at the gauge on the furnace. After turning the system on and running it for an hour. The pressure seemed to be coming up to about 25-30 psi. I am sure it is because of expansion as the water in the boiler and pipes get warmer.

What should the at rest pressure be? And what should the running pressure be?

By the way there was a little RED arrow on the PSI gauge at just around 30psi. I was just curious if that was a MAXIMUM arrow or a NORMAL setting.

The system ran fine and heated up with no problems. I am just wondering if the pressure is too high.

Furnace - Oil fired Energy Kinetics System 2000
Hot water circulation in Old fashion Cast Iron Radiators
2 Story 100 year old house.

Thanks Jim
 
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Old 01-16-06, 04:04 PM
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Pressure

30# is MAX. Normal would be around 15#. Just relieve some pressure via the purge valve.
 
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Old 01-17-06, 08:43 AM
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Volume

Have you calculated the total water volume to be sure that the current expansion tank is sufficiently large enough? Is the bladder in it fine?
 
 

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