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Old 01-18-06, 07:01 AM
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Would someone please explain why you should not use compression fittings on fuel oil lines? Why is a flare fitting better than compression?
 
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Old 01-18-06, 03:32 PM
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Compression vs. flare

Compression fittings tend to leak. If they don't leak oil, they leak air. With a flare fitting, you are machining the end of the tubing to match the fitting onto which it is to be mated.
 
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Old 01-19-06, 08:19 AM
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I don't know what kind of compression fittings you have seen leak. The type that I use are swagelock fittings and are in use in a power house. Some are used with steam/ water/ air from 10 to 1500psi. I have used them from 1/4" up to 1/2" copper and stainless with no leaks (when properly tightened and checked with a go no go gauge). I am not arguing with you, I'm just curious why something that is in use in heavy industry isn't good enough for home use.
 
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Old 01-19-06, 08:56 AM
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apples and oranges. they're not used in automotive brake systems either. compression fittings of the nature discussed are basic off the shelf hardware store ice maker parts. you won't see anyone using them for lp or natural gas applications either. they do offer the advantage to the installer of not needing a flairing tool , male and female counter parts, and the ability to make a quick splice repair. but that's about it
 
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Old 01-19-06, 05:19 PM
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Swagelock

As long as they are checked with a go-no go gauge, they are fine. Most people tend to overtighten Swagelocks. It could come down to an insurance thing. Heaven forbid you had a problem with a fuel line on which Swagelocks were used & had to file an insurance claim. A sharp adjuster would deny the claim simply because flares are specified & you used Swagelocks. Granted they are not anywhere near as bad as ordinary plumbing compression fittings, but the fact remains, flares are the industry specified method.
 
 

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