Adding 24VAC to my thermostat?


  #1  
Old 01-27-06, 08:20 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 16
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Adding 24VAC to my thermostat?

Hello,
I have a honeywell vision pro 8000 thermostat that is attached to my laars boiler. The boiler has connections for W and R -- a basic call for heat.

I have been replacing batteries on the thermostat more than once a month. I am interested in running a 24VAC through the thermostat to avoid the never-ending battery supply.

I have no connection on the boiler's circuit board for a 24VAC. Can I add a transformer and run a wire to the thermostat seperately? Any ideas from anybody?

thanks in advance, -jamie
 
  #2  
Old 01-27-06, 08:47 PM
KField's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 3,015
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
You can add a transformer. If you don't use the thermostat for cooling, you can take the jumper off between Rh and Rc and connect the 24 volts to Rc and Common on the thermostat. You should not have to replace those batteries nearly that often but may have something draining them. Once you add the power supply, you can have the backlight stay on all the time. That makes a cool nightlight. If you add the transformer, you could damage the boiler circuit if you don't remove the jumper.

Ken
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-06, 05:02 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 16
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
great! That's the answer i was looking for! So what kind of transformer should I get? Will home depot carry something like this? thanks again -jamie
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-06, 07:30 PM
KField's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 3,015
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The one I use most often is a Honeywell AT72D and it either can be installed on a knockout on an electrical box or as a cover for a 4" square electrical box. I'm sure there are others and as long as it puts out 24vac at 20 va or more, it will work. The AT72D is a 40va transformer and has more power than your thermostat will need but it is a relatively average and popular unit.

Ken
 
  #5  
Old 02-02-06, 11:10 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 16
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
awesome. thanks a mil'. -j
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: