seized radiator valves


  #1  
Old 02-28-06, 04:34 PM
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Question seized radiator valves

hi there , i'm wondering what are some tricks of the trade to loosen these very old on-the floor radiator valves. the coupling nut isn't a problem but the valve on the vertical pipe just won't budge.....it is a one pipe steam system...is using a propane torch an effective method? i'm afraid too aggressive wrenching may break the pipe creating a whole new mess...lubricants like PB doesn't seem to be too effective......also when putting new valve on...do you guys prefer rectorseal no. 5 or slic tite or the white teflon tape...also what is that odd shaped tool that is inserted into the valve stem that goes into the radiator. it has graduated rungs and is used like a wrench but from inside...thx for any info
 
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Old 02-28-06, 04:47 PM
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Radiator Valve

You will probably need more heat than you can get out of a hand held propane torch. Another trick is to hold a heavy hammer against one side of the hex on the valve & wail on the side 180 from the heavy hammer.
The tool you refer to is called a "radiator spud wrench".
As to thread sealants: For steam, I prefer a pipe joint compound called "Blue Block". Just a heads up on Blue Block: It is mighty tough to get off your skin or anything else & heaven help you if you ever want to take that joint apart again. I don't like any pipe dope with teflon in it or teflon tape. It make it too easy to over tighten the valve & possibly split it.
 
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Old 02-28-06, 11:04 PM
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"You will probably need more heat than you can get out of a hand held propane torch."

So a mapp torch?...would i heat the valve body or the pipe under where valve connects and for how long?

"Another trick is to hold a heavy hammer against one side of the hex on the valve & wail on the side 180 from the heavy hammer."

So as long as I have a solid object to stabalize the valve body......I notice watching the pro's do it once they were using a chisel but since it was a tight area I couldnt see where they were placing the chisel...I guess that was another trick of the trade

"The tool you refer to is called a "radiator spud wrench"."

Is this the tool you would actually be turning clockwise to loosen. I recall from watching that one time everything was lefty loosey righty tighty except for one thing and I think it was when they were attempting to get the spud out of radiator

"As to thread sealants: For steam, I prefer a pipe joint compound called "Blue Block". Just a heads up on Blue Block: It is mighty tough to get off your skin or anything else & heaven help you if you ever want to take that joint apart again. I don't like any pipe dope with teflon in it or teflon tape. It make it too easy to over tighten the valve & possibly split it."

blue block sounds tenacious...since I may be the one undoing it someday I'm a little reluctant but I noticed the pro's used slic tite but since they were using all new parts everything mated well anyways

I have prolly over 100 valves in this old building and some are starting to go.....I should be a pro after valve replacement 23 heh...Thanks for your tips Grady
 
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Old 03-01-06, 05:28 PM
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Radiator Valves

I doubt even Mapp in a hand held torch would be enough unless the torch were a Turbo-Torch or similar. You would want to heat on the valve body near the bottom. Make sure the radiator is disconnected & a piece of fireproof insulation between the union halfs would not hurt either.

I don't think radiator threads are left handed but it's been at least 15 years so don't take that as gospel. A quick look at the new valve & matching union would tell you pretty quickly.

Blue Block is indeed Nasty stuff. (note the capital N)

By the time you get done, you certainly should be an expert & able to pass along tips to the rest of us.
 
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Old 03-03-06, 04:31 AM
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Cool Hope this helps

I didnt know this question was already answered... sorry... my answer is redundant... LOL

That tool you are referring too, in the auto world, is also known as a valve stem remover.... if that helps... lol

Take care,
AkVirgo_75m
 
 

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