Summer temperature settings


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Old 04-08-06, 12:48 PM
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Question Summer temperature settings

Trying to decide on the proper summer temperature settings for a hot water boiler with coil to preheat water into an electric hot water heater. System worked well in winter, cutting electric bill substantially, but what is best summer setting. The options, as I see them and my thoughts on each, are:

1. Turn boiler off completely. Makes sense economically as with the current price of oil I'll save more money on oil over the years than the cost of a new boiler, but I'll be saddled with replacing the boiler sooner.

2. Leave it at the winter settings. I'll continue saving on electricity, but the cost of oil will far exceed those savings.

3. Turn the low temperature setting to the minimum, about 100 degrees, and continue heating my hot water. The boiler will fire every time I draw hot water and how much will it actually heat the water if it is at 100 degrees.

4. Turn the low temperature setting to the minimum and bypass the coil to heat the water entirely with my hot water heater. I'll see higher electric costs, but will spend the minimum for oil over the summer while better maintaining the boiler than turning it off.

I lean to option 4, but it's just a guess. Anyone have concrete estimates on costs and other factors to determine what is best.

Bill
 
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Old 04-08-06, 07:03 PM
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Boiler summer temps

I would tend to lean toward option #3 & turn the settings to
100-110 (low) & 120-130 (high). You would likely get 85-100 out of the domestic coil. This beats the daylights out of 50-60 water going directly into the electric water heater, keeps the boiler warm all year (increases boiler life), reduces electric consumption, minimizes oil consumption, & keeps the coil flushed out. If your boiler recovers quickly, why not put in an indirect?
 
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Old 04-09-06, 04:10 AM
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indirect

I plan to consider an indirect when my water heater needs to be replaced. My piping is such that I can take my water heater out of the loop and heat water with my boiler while deciding and waiting for installation.

Bill
 
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Old 04-09-06, 07:18 AM
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Indirect

Something to keep in mind when considering an indirect: Not all boilers are well suited for cold start applications. If your boiler has a large water volume or for some other reason is slow to heat, an indirect is not going to save you the money often associated with indirects.
 
 

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