Heating system design


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Old 05-06-06, 03:44 PM
J
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Heating system design

Well, I'm getting closer to replacing my heatiing system, but have some more questions.

Most of my basement is finished and will be heated. One area, which contains the boiler and laundry machines is not finished. Currently, it's kept warm by the steam boiler and pipes. It's approximately 1/4 of my total basement floor area. I am assuming that I don't need to put in radiators here, as the boiler itself should keep it warm. But do I include it in the heat loss calculations?

Also, I have a long narrow space in the basement (about 3.5' wide, and the length of the house) that is the access corridor to the gas meter, the water inlet, the main house drain, and electrical panel. The wall between this space and the finished part of the basement is insulated. Currently, steam pipes run through the space and keep it warm. Should I be putting in radiators here? How do I treat it for the heat loss calcs?

Thanks.
 
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Old 05-07-06, 03:18 PM
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Generally one does not include "unconditioned spaces" (no added heating or cooling) in heat loss/gain calculations.

You may want to include plugged tees on your new piping system to allow placement of radiators, convectors or unit heaters in these spaces if it becomes necessary at a future date.
 
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Old 05-08-06, 05:18 AM
J
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So do you treat the wall between the conditioned space and the unconditioned as an "exterior" wall? Wouldn't that lead to an overestimate of the heat loss as the interior walls may not be as well insulated?
 
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Old 05-08-06, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by jgalak
So do you treat the wall between the conditioned space and the unconditioned as an "exterior" wall? Wouldn't that lead to an overestimate of the heat loss as the interior walls may not be as well insulated?
That is an excellent question and I don't know the answer. Most likely it won't make any significant difference.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 06:55 AM
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I don't know the answer either. Not really sure what to suggest. My inclination, of all things, is to wing it. Pipe the system so that if you did need something in the long corridor, you could tap in to the revamped system easily. I think basements, unless particularly drafty, do a pretty good job of keeping themselves habitable due to being below ground, few windows, conditioned space overjead, etc.

For the finished space, you could probably figure heat loss pretty conservatively since you have a "double-wall" along one side (maybe fake an ODT along that wall as something like 40-50F??), and the 1/4 of basement that is mechanical room is very nearly "conditioned space as far as heat loss is concerned.

My ~24x24 unfinished basement is kept habitable by leaving a certain amount of near-boiler piping uninsulated....
 
 

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