zone heat piping layout


  #1  
Old 08-01-06, 06:40 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
zone heat piping layout

I would like to upgrade my heating system (oil-fired, forced hot water). Currently there is one pump supplying two heating zones and one hot water tank zone. I would like to have three heating zones and one hot water tank zone each supplied by its own pump. The problem is that I do not know how to layout the plumbing. Where do the pumps go in relation to check valves and fill and drain valves etc? Does anyone know of a place to get an actual drawing showing what I need?
Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 08-02-06, 02:26 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 14,401
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Piping layout

You might want to check Burnham, Taco, or Bell & Gossett's web sites. B&G used to have a book called either zoning made easy or zoning made simple. Don't know if it is still available or not.
 
  #3  
Old 08-04-06, 05:03 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
found piping layout

Thanks for the info. I ended up finding a basic schematic on the Weil-Mclain web site. That set me on the right path, but I have another question. On their schematic they show two check valves per zone, one on the hot side before the water goes through the radiators and one on the cold side just before the pipes merge and reenter the boiler. Is this overkill? Do I really need two check valves?
 
  #4  
Old 08-04-06, 04:10 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 14,401
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Check valves

I suspect the reason for two flo-checks on each zone is to reduce or eliminate the possibility of "ghost flow". This can happen, depending on piping lay out, when only one zone is calling for heat. The circulator can actually partially open the flow check on the second zone. I personally don't like zone valves but since they are an electrically operated valve, this problem does not arrise when using them. If the job were mine, I would use the double flo-checks & a circulator on each zone. If for some reason, the circulator cannot overcome the restriction of two flo-checks, one can be opened manually. Far easier to install while the system is down & drained than have to install them later.
Better to have & not need than need & not have.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: