Wire Management Tips for Stat/Zone Valves/etc.


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Old 08-21-06, 05:38 PM
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Wire Management Tips for Stat/Zone Valves/etc.

I have three Sparco zone valves (4 wire) that will be used with HeatRite stats (3 wire, including a common). What's some neat, professional methods of doing the interconnecting wiring between the 24 volt transformer, stats and the zone valves? I don't relish having a nest of wire nuts hiding inside of a 4" box. I don't really want to spring 70 bucks for a Taco ZCV403 either... Looking for some ideas on how others have handled this. Barrier strips?? I'd like it to look pro when it is done.

Pete
 
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Old 08-21-06, 06:51 PM
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Since it is all low-voltage you don't need to enclose the wiring. Barrier strips with individual terminals for each wire (don't forget the circulator control) would look quite nice. You could bring all the themostat and valve wiring in on one side and then install appropriate jumpers between the valves and thermostats on the other side. I would run all the zone valve terminals in one area and all the thermostat wires in a different area. Be sure to make a detailed map (wiring diagram) of all the connections.
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:06 PM
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Rat's nest wiring

That is one of the many reasons I hate zone valves. Extremely rare is the person who takes the time to make a neat job of it.
If you do the barrier strip thing, laminate the wiring diagram & hang it right next to the strip. There is little that agrivates me more than trying to figure out somebody's wiring when all it would have taken is a few minutes to make a diagram & hang it near where it would be used. You can imagine what it cost a homeowner one time when, on overtime, I had to sort thru an 18 control wire system all done in 2 colors, 9 sets of 2-lead thermostat wire. Grrrrr
The next day I went back with rolls of numbers I got at my local electrial supply house.
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:21 PM
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Diagrams

Hi Grady

I used to draw schematics for a technical magazine, so you can bet all of the wiring will be documented, and the wires color coded and labeled! In fact all of the paperwork and manuals for anything used in the system will be going into two duplicate looseleaf binders. One will be left with the boilers, the other in another safe place.

From what I've been reading in other forums, going with separate circulators for each zone would have been preferred over using zone valves?
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:45 PM
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Circs vs. zone valves

You sound like a person on the ball when it comes to wiring. With documentation like that, a service guy would probably give YOU a tip.
I much prefer a circulator for each zone but in some cases, such as small zones, zone valves work better. The big drawback to zone valves is when the one circulator goes down, all the zones are down. The same could be said for the multi-zone switching relays. If the transformer in that relay goes out, the whole circulatory system is down.
 
 

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