Plugging leaks


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Old 08-22-06, 02:02 PM
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Plugging leaks

I've pressurized the new boiler (to 20 psi, slightly over the 10 psi it will be run at), and fixed a few bad solder joints on elbows, etc. I noticed one or two of the 1-1/4" ball valves are showing very, very small leaks at the threaded seams where the valve body sections are factory assembled together. The leaks are minute, and I really don't want to try and break the solder joints to redo the threaded seals on the ball valves. By minute, I mean a very, very small droplet at the seam, no drips..

I was wondering if it's possible to use a product such as the pellets used to seal car radiator leaks? I don't want to screw up my circulators, etc.; so I figured I'd ask the pros if there is a SAFE product that can used for this purpose? Or, will these self seal, or get worse if left alone? If not, I'll do what needs to be done, based on your advice.

Pete
 
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Old 08-22-06, 04:09 PM
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Leaks

DO NOT add ANY kind of sealant to the system. If need be replace the valves. Whenever I use threaded valves with an adaptor to copper, I make up the adaptor and as much copper as possible to the adaptor THEN screw the adaptor into the threads.
Regarding the oxygen problem & the chemical treatment there of; I'm not sure what they use. Furd would be better qualified than I on this subject since he worked on commercial equipment where boiler treatment is common.
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:11 PM
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Hi Grady

The valves are sweat soldered, not pipe thread. The leak is where the two sections of the valve were joined together at the factory. I had to take a few apart to fix similar problems. Those were on 3/4 inch tube, so it was easy to cut the tubing, and use a union to patch things. The 1-1/4 will be a major pain to redo. Probably got what I deserved for using Chinese imports!

I wasn't the fellow who asked about the O2 scavengers, but I have looked for boiler treatment in various plumbing supply houses, and no one carries it in this area. In fact, there seems to be no demand for the product. I wonder if anyone is treating residential boiler water these days for PH and O2? It seems like a good practice.

Pete
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:29 PM
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Sorry, Pete

I got my threads mixed up. Rough day at work.
As long as we are on the subject of pH & oxygen control: Such things are normally not needed on a closed loop system with little to no make-up water being added. In a very short time, the water in the system will become "neutral" & the oxygen will be expelled or consumed.
I now understand your situation better & might suggest a light coat of J B Weld if you can get the valves dry for 24 hours. It may not look pretty but the stuff works. A proper repair would be to use threaded valves & follow what I said earlier. If heat transfer might be a problem when soldering, wrap a wet rag around that which you want to keep cool.
 
 

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